Monday, June 04, 2018

Amazon Rainforest | International Space Station

"Like the rainforest that surrounds and depends upon it, the Amazon river system is a prodigy of speciation and diversity..."—Candice Millard
U.S. astronaut Ricky Arnold: "From the International Space Station, it is also a place where you can see the Earth breathe."

The Amazon rainforest, also known in English as Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is a moist broadleaf forest in the Amazon biome that covers most of the Amazon basin of South America. This basin encompasses 7,000,000 km2 (2,700,000 sq mi), of which 5,500,000 km2 (2,100,000 sq mi) are covered by the rainforest. This region includes territory belonging to nine nations. The majority of the forest is contained within Brazil, with 60% of the rainforest, followed by Peru with 13%, Colombia with 10%, and with minor amounts in Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana. States or departments in four nations contain "Amazonas" in their names. The Amazon represents over half of the planet's remaining rainforests, and comprises the largest and most biodiverse tract of tropical rainforest in the world, with an estimated 390 billion individual trees divided into 16,000 species. (Source: Wikipedia)

Candice Sue Millard (born 1967/1968) is an American writer and journalist. She is a former writer and editor for National Geographic. (Source: Wikipedia)

Credit: NASA Astronaut Ricky Arnold
Release Date: June 4, 2018


#NASA #Space #ISS #Science #Earth #Brazil #Brasil #Rainforest #Amazon #AmazĂ´nica #AmazĂ´nia #River #Trees #Deforestation #Environment #Climate #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming #Atlantic #Ocean #SouthAmerica #Astronaut #RickyArnold #Human #Spaceflight #Spacecraft #UnitedStates #Photography #STEM #Education #International #OrbitalPerspective #OverviewEffect

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