Sunday, July 29, 2018

Understanding Lunar Eclipses | NASA


It's not often that we get a chance to see our planet's shadow, but a lunar eclipse gives us a fleeting glimpse. During these rare events, the full Moon rapidly darkens and then glows red as it enters the Earth's shadow. Though a lunar eclipse can be seen only at night, it's worth staying up to catch the show. ​The next lunar eclipse that can be seen all over the U.S. will be on Jan. 21, 2019. It will also be a supermoon. The January 2019 a total lunar eclipse will be visible in the Americas, Europa, Africa and the Central Pacific.
See the 2019 eclipse map (PDF) here:
https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/LEplot/LEplot2001/LE2019Jan21T.pdf

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Duration: 2 minutes
Release Date: April 8, 2014



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