Saturday, September 14, 2019

The Terminator | International Space Station

The Terminator | International Space Station
European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano took this image of the line that separates day from night, known as the terminator, during his Beyond mission. He captioned it: "To be able to observe with one’s own eyes the night coming in, that line between day and obscurity, is always an experience of surreal, inexplicable emotion."

Learn about Luca's Beyond mission:
http://lucaparmitano.esa.int

Credit: ESA/NASA-L.Parmitano
Image Date: July 29, 2019


#NASA #Space #ISS #Science #Technology #Earth #Day #Night #Terminator #Astronaut #ESA #LucaParmitano #MissionBeyond #Italia #Italy #Expedition60 #Human #Spaceflight #Spacecraft #STEM #Education #OverviewEffect #OrbitalPerspective

Tropical Storm Humberto Forms Close to Bahamas

Tropical Storm Humberto Forms Close to Bahamas

Tropical Cyclone Nine became a tropical storm as it moved northwestward over the Southwest Atlantic Ocean, bringing strong winds and heavy rainfall to the central and northwest Bahamas, including areas recently devastated by Hurricane Dorian. Tropical storm Humberto will likely bring tropical-storm-force-winds and heavy rainfall to portions of the northwestern Bahamas today. Significant storm surge is not expected in the northwestern Bahamas from this system. The center of Humberto is now passing just east of Great Abaco Island.

The future track of this system is still uncertain, and forecasters will continue to monitor it closely.

For the latest information, visit the National Hurricane Center:
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/cyclones/

This GeoColor-enhanced imagery was created by NOAA's partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere. The GOES East geostationary satellite, also known as GOES-16, provides coverage of the Western Hemisphere, including the United States, the Atlantic Ocean and the eastern Pacific. The satellite's high-resolution imagery provides optimal viewing of severe weather events, including thunderstorms, tropical storms, and hurricanes.

Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Image Date: September 13, 2019

#NASA #NOAA #Space #Satellite #Science #Earth #Tropical #Storm #Humberto #Atlantic #Ocean #Florida #Bahamas #Weather #Meteorology #GOESEast #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

Friday, September 13, 2019

East Timor Sunset | International Space Station

East Timor Sunset | International Space Station
An image of a sunset in East Timor captured by European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano during his Beyond mission to the International Space Station.

East Timor or Timor-Leste, officially the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, is a country in Maritime Southeast Asia. It comprises the eastern half of the island of Timor, the nearby islands of Atauro and Jaco, and Oecusse, an exclave on the northwestern side of the island surrounded by Indonesian West Timor. Australia is the country's southern neighbor, separated by the Timor Sea. 
(Source: Wikipedia)

Credit: ESA/NASA-L.Parmitano
Image Date: August 23, 2019


#NASA #Space #ISS #Science #Technology #Earth #TimorLeste #EastTimor #Asia #PacificOcean #Astronaut #ESA #LucaParmitano #MissionBeyond #Italia #Italy #Expedition60 #Human #Spaceflight #Spacecraft #STEM #Education #OverviewEffect #OrbitalPerspective

Inside NASA's Kennedy Space Center | Week of Sept. 13, 2019

Inside NASA's Kennedy Space Center | Week of Sept. 13, 2019
Hurricane Dorian skirted the coast of Kennedy Space Center on Sept. 3 and 4. A few days before, the Mobile Launcher, atop the crawler-transporter, was moved from Launch Pad 39B back to the Vehicle Assembly as a precaution. Kennedy Director Bob Cabana presented awards to NASA and contractor employees during the center's annual NASA KSC Honor Awards Ceremony on Sept. 10.

Credit: NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC)
Duration: 1 minute, 36 seconds
Release Date: September 13, 2019

#NASA #Space #Science #Astronomy #SLS #Rocket #Orion #Artemis #Moon #Mars #Dorian #Hurricane #HurricaneDorian #Kennedy #KSC #Spaceport #Florida #UnitedStates #Women #Engineering #STEM #Education #Video

Earth from Space: Baja California, Mexico | ESA

Earth from Space: Baja California, Mexico | ESA
The European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite takes us over the region of Baja California in northwest Mexico, in this week's edition of the Earth from Space program.

We are Europe's gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe's space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
Duration: 2 minutes, 52 seconds
Release Date: September 13, 2019


#NASA #ESA #Earth #Space #Satellite #BajaCalifornia #Baja #Mexico #México #Europe #EarthObservation #RemoteSensing #EarthFromSpace #Copernicus #Sentinel1 #STEM #Education #HD #Video

NASA's Space to Ground: Counting Down | Week of Sept. 13, 2019

NASA's Space to Ground: Counting Down
Week of Sept. 13, 2019
Sept. 13, 2019: NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.

The crew of Expedition 60, consisting of Commander Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos; NASA astronauts Christina Koch, Andrew Morgan and Nick Hague; ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Luca Parmitano; and cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, took much-needed respite on Thursday during an off-duty day aboard the International Space Station. This Friday, investigations furthering scientific research in support of crew health and extended travels to destinations deeper in the solar system are resuming.

On Earth, the Expedition 61 prime crew of cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka and NASA astronaut Jessica Meir, along with spaceflight participant Hazzaa Ali Almansoori, are at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, finalizing pre-launch training and preparations for their launch on Sept. 25 aboard a Soyuz MS-15 spacecraft. On Wednesday, they ran through procedures and completed the necessary fit check, spacesuits donned, within the Soyuz vehicle. On Thursday, they took part in ceremonial activities, such as raising the flags of Russia, the United States, and the United Arab Emirates, along with backup crew members Tom Marshburn of NASA, Sergey Ryzhikov of Roscosmos and spaceflight participant Sultan Al-Neyadi of the United Arab Emirates.

Credit: NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC)
Duration: 2 minutes, 4 seconds
Release Date: September 13, 2019



#NASA #Space #ISS #Science #Soyuz #Rocket #Research #Microgravity #Astronauts #JessicaMeir #Cosmonauts #OlegSkripochka #HazzaaAliAlmansoori #UAE #الإمارات‎#Russia #Россия #Expedition61 #Human #Spaceflight #Spacecraft #JSC #Houston #Texas #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #Video #وكالةالإمارات للفضاء

Thursday, September 12, 2019

Hubble’s Brand New Image of Saturn | NASA

Hubble’s Brand New Image of Saturn | NASA
Sept. 12, 2019: This new Hubble Space Telescope view of Saturn, taken in late June 2019, reveals the giant planet's iconic rings. Saturn’s amber colors come from summer smog-like hazes, produced in photochemical reactions driven by solar ultraviolet radiation. Below the haze lie clouds of ammonia ice crystals, as well as deeper, unseen lower-level clouds of ammonium hydrosulfide and water.

The planet’s banded structure is caused by winds and clouds at different altitudes. Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 observed Saturn on June 20, 2019, as the planet made its closest approach to Earth, at about 845 million miles away.

For more information, visit: https://go.nasa.gov/30eSrbH

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Paul R. Morris (USRA): Lead Producer
Music Credits: "Momentum" by Guillaume Bernard [SACEM]; Universal Production Music
Duration: 1 minute, 27 seconds
Release Date: September 12, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Saturn #Rings #Planet #SolarSystem #Telescope #ESA #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education #Video

Saturn Close-up | Hubble

Saturn Close-up | Hubble
This video pans over the planet Saturn, as recently observed with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope on June 20, 2019, when it was approximately 1.36 billion kilometers away.

Credit:
NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley)
Duration: 19 seconds
Capture Date: June 20, 2019
Release Date: September 12, 2019


Saturn's Rings Shine in New Hubble Portrait | NASA

Saturn's Rings Shine in New Hubble Portrait | NASA
Sept. 12, 2019: The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 observed Saturn on June 20, 2019 as the planet made its closest approach to Earth this year, at approximately 1.36 billion kilometers away.

Since the Hubble Space Telescope was launched, its goal has been to study not only distant astronomical objects, but also the planets within our Solar System. Hubble’s high-resolution images of our planetary neighbors can only be surpassed by pictures taken from spacecraft that actually visit these bodies. However, Hubble has one advantage over space probes; it can look at these objects periodically and observe them over much longer periods than any passing probe could.
Saturn hosts many recognizable features, most notably its trademark ring system, which is now tilted towards Earth. This gives us a magnificent view of its bright icy structure. Hubble resolves numerous ringlets and the fainter inner rings. Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens first identified the rings in 1655 and thought they were a continuous disk encircling the planet, but we now know them to be composed of orbiting particles of ice and dust. Though all of the gas giants boast rings, Saturn’s are the largest and most spectacular.

The age of Saturn’s ring system continues to be debated. And, even more perplexingly, it is unknown what cosmic event formed the rings. There is no consensus among planetary astronomers today.
Another intriguing feature is the long-lasting hexagon-shaped structure circling the planet’s north pole. It is a mysterious six-sided pattern caused by a high-speed jetstream. The hexagon is so large that four Earths could fit inside its boundaries (there is no similar structure at Saturn’s south pole).
Other features, however, are not as long-lasting. A large storm in the north polar region spotted by Hubble last year has disappeared. Smaller, convective storms, such as the one just above the center of the planet’s image, also come and go.

Saturn’s amber colors come from summer smog-like hazes, produced in photochemical reactions driven by solar ultraviolet radiation. Below the haze lie clouds of ammonia ice crystals, as well as deeper, unseen lower-level clouds of ammonium hydrosulphide and water. The planet’s banded structure is caused by the winds and clouds at different altitudes.

Saturn’s appearance changes with its seasons, caused by the planet’s 27-degree axial tilt. This image was taken during summer in the planet’s northern hemisphere.

This image is the second in a yearly series of snapshots taken as part of the Outer Planets Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) project. OPAL is helping scientists to understand the atmospheric dynamics and evolution of our Solar System’s gas giant planets. In Saturn’s case, astronomers will be able to track shifting weather patterns and other changes to identify trends.
The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley)
Release Date: September 12, 2019

#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Saturn #Rings #Planet #SolarSystem #Telescope #ESA #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Hubble Finds Water Vapor on Distant Exoplanet | NASA

Hubble Finds Water Vapor on Distant Exoplanet | NASA
Exoplanet distance from Earth: 110 light years
Sept. 11, 2019: With data from the Hubble Space Telescope, water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere of an exoplanet within the habitable zone of its host star.

K2-18b, which is eight times the mass of Earth, is the only planet orbiting a star outside the solar system (or “exoplanet”) within the habitable zone.

For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble

Video Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Paul R. Morris (USRA): Lead Producer
Music Credits: "Only Human" by Guillaume Bernard [SACEM]; Universal Production Music
Duration: 2 minutes, 3 seconds
Release Date: September 11, 2019



#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Exoplanet #K218b #Atmosphere #Water #Planet #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #ESA #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #Art #Illustration #STEM #Education #Video

Water Detected on Exoplanet K2-18b | Hubble

Water Detected on Exoplanet K2-18b | Hubble
First Water Detected on Planet in the Habitable Zone
Sept. 11, 2019: This Hubblecast Light video highlights the exciting discovery of the first water detected on a potentially habitable planet. With data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere of a super-Earth with habitable temperatures by University College Longon (UCL) researchers.

Credit:
Directed by: Bethany Downer
Editing: Nico Bartmann.
Web and technical support: Mathias André and Raquel Yumi Shida.
Written by: Bethany Downer & UCL
Music:
Footage and photos: ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab
Duration: 1 minute, 19 seconds
Release Date: September 11, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Exoplanet #K218b #Atmosphere #Water #Planet #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #ESA #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #Art #Illustration #STEM #Education #Video

First Water Detected on Planet in Habitable Zone | Hubble

First Water Detected on Planet in Habitable Zone | Hubble
Exoplanet distance to Earth: 110 light years
With data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere of a super-Earth within the habitable zone by University College London (UCL) researchers in a world first. K2-18b, which is eight times the mass of Earth, is now the only planet orbiting a star outside the Solar System, or exoplanet, known to have both water and temperatures that could support life.

The discovery, published today in Nature Astronomy, is the first successful atmospheric detection of an exoplanet orbiting in its star’s habitable zone, at a distance where water can exist in liquid form.

Image: This artist’s impression shows the planet K2-18b, its host star and an accompanying planet in this system. K2-18b is now the only super-Earth exoplanet known to host both water and temperatures that could support life.

First author, Dr Angelos Tsiaras (UCL Centre for Space Exochemistry Data,CSED), said: “Finding water on a potentially habitable world other than Earth is incredibly exciting. K2-18b is not ‘Earth 2.0’ as it is significantly heavier and has a different atmospheric composition. However, it brings us closer to answering the fundamental question: Is the Earth unique?”

The team used archive data from 2016 and 2017 captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and developed open-source algorithms to analyse the starlight filtered through K2-18b’s atmosphere [1]. The results revealed the molecular signature of water vapor, also indicating the presence of hydrogen and helium in the planet’s atmosphere.

The authors believe that other molecules, including nitrogen and methane, may be present but they remain undetectable with current observations. Further studies are required to estimate cloud coverage and the percentage of atmospheric water present.

The planet orbits the cool dwarf star K2-18, which is 110 light years from Earth in the constellation of Leo. Given the high level of activity of its red dwarf star, K2-18b may be more hostile than Earth and is likely to be exposed to more radiation.

K2-18b was discovered in 2015 and is one of hundreds of super-Earths—planets with masses between those of Earth and Neptune—found by NASA’s Kepler spacecraft. NASA’s TESS mission is expected to detect hundreds more super-Earths in the coming years.

Co-author Dr Ingo Waldmann (UCL CSED), said: “With so many new super-Earths expected to be found over the next couple of decades, it is likely that this is the first discovery of many potentially habitable planets. This is not only because super-Earths like K2-18b are the most common planets in our Milky Way, but also because red dwarfs—stars smaller than our Sun—are the most common stars.”

The next generation of space telescopes, including the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope and ESA’s ARIEL mission, will be able to characterize atmospheres in more detail as they will carry more advanced instruments. ARIEL is expected to launch in 2028 and will observe 1,000 planets in detail to get a truly representative picture of what they are like.

Professor Giovanna Tinetti (UCL CSED), co-author and Principal Investigator for ARIEL, said: “Our discovery makes K2-18b one of the most interesting targets for future study. Over 4000 exoplanets have been detected but we don’t know much about their composition and nature. By observing a large sample of planets, we hope to reveal secrets about their chemistry, formation and evolution.”

“This study contributes to our understanding of habitable worlds beyond our Solar System and marks a new era in exoplanet research, crucial to ultimately placing the Earth, our only home, into the greater picture of the Cosmos,” said Dr Tsiaras.

Notes
[1] The observations were achieved from 9 transits of K2-18b with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), as part of the HST proposals 13665 and 14682 (PI: Björn Benneke).

More information
The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

Angelos Tsiaras, Ingo P. Waldmann, Giovanna Tinetti, Jonathan Tennyson & Sergey N. Yurchenko, ‘Water vapour in the atmosphere of the habitable-zone eight Earth-mass planet K2-18 b’ has been published in Nature Astronomy.

The research was funded by European Research Council and the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council which is part of UKRI.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser
Release Date: September 11, 2019

#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Exoplanet #K218b #Atmosphere #Water #Planet #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #ESA #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #Art #Illustration #STEM #Education

Earth: Gulf of Guinea to Caspian Sea | International Space Station

Gulf of Guinea to Caspian Sea | International Space Station

Original timelapse by Riccardo Rossi (ISAA)

ISAA (Italian Space and Astronautics Association)

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
Raw imagery courtesy of Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth: http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov

Music: Soft Gentle Piano by BDKSonic - Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License
https://www.jamendo.com/artist/486550/bdksonic

Timelapse HD 1080p video

Credit: AstronautiCAST/JSC
Capture Date: August 7, 2019
Release Date: August 11, 2019
Duration: 2 minutes, 31 seconds

#NASA #Space #Astronomy #Earth #ISS #Planet #Spacecraft #Astronauts #Expedition60 #Guinea #CaspianSea #Photography #Art #Science #OrbitalPerspective #OverviewEffect #AstronautiCAST #ISAA #STEM #Education #Timelapse #Video

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Earth from Space: Italy's Castelli Romani | European Space Agency

Earth from Space: Italy's Castelli Romani | ESA
Earth from Space is back after the summer break!
The Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite takes us over a set of small towns, located around 20 km southeast of Rome, Italy and known collectively as Castelli Romani, in this week's edition of the Earth from Space program.

Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
Duration: 3 minutes
Release Date: September 6, 2019


#NASA #ESA #Earth #Space #Satellite #Italy #Italia #CastelliRomani #Europe #EarthObservation #RemoteSensing #Copernicus #Sentinel2 #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Monday, September 09, 2019

Human Technology | International Space Station

Human Technology | International Space Station
Image captured by European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano during his Beyond mission to the International Space Station. Notice the moon at top right.

Luca: "One of the most innovative technologies flies over one of the most ancient cultures on Earth."

"Una delle tecnologie più innovative vola sopra una delle culture più antiche della terra."

Credit: ESA/NASA-L.Parmitano
Image Date: August 24, 2019



#NASA #Space #ISS #Science #Technology #Earth #Astronaut #ESA #LucaParmitano #MissionBeyond #Italia #Italy #Expedition60 #Human #Spaceflight #Spacecraft #STEM #Education #OverviewEffect #OrbitalPerspective

Dark Matter in the Belly of the Whale | Hubble

Dark Matter in the Belly of the Whale
This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, focuses on an object named UGC 695, which is located 30 million light-years away within the constellation Cetus (The Sea Monster), also known as The Whale.

UGC 695 is a low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxy. These galaxies are so faint that their brightness is less than the background brightness of Earth’s atmosphere, which makes them tricky to observe. This low brightness is the result of the relatively small number of stars within them — most of the baryonic matter in these galaxies exists in the form of huge clouds of gas and dust. The stars are also distributed over a relatively large area.

LSB galaxies, like dwarf galaxies, have a high fraction of dark matter relative to the number of stars they contain. Astronomers still debate about how LSB galaxies formed in the first place.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, D. Calzetti
Release Date: September 9, 2019



#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #UGC695 #LSB #Cetus #DarkMatter #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #ESA #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education

Sunday, September 08, 2019

Jupiter’s Dynamic Atmosphere: A Close-Up Look

Jupiter’s Dynamic Atmosphere: A Close-Up Look
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals the intricate, detailed beauty of Jupiter’s clouds in this new image taken on June 27, 2019 by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, when the planet was 644 million kilometers from Earth. The image features the distinct bands of roiling clouds that are characteristic of Jupiter’s atmosphere and represents a stretched-out map of the entire planet.

Researchers combined several Hubble exposures to create this flat map, which excludes the polar regions (above 80 degrees latitude). These observations of Jupiter form part of the Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program.

Credit:
NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley)
Release Date: August 8, 2019

#NASA #Hubble #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Jupiter #Planet #Atmosphere #GreatRedSpot #Visualization #SolarSystem #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education

Zooming Into Jupiter's Great Red Spot

Zooming Into Jupiter's Great Red Spot
This video is a pan across the surface of Jupiter, featuring a zoom into the planet's trademark Great Red Spot.

This new image was taken on June 27, 2019 by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, when the planet was 644 million kilometers from Earth. The image highlights the Great Red Spot in a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in the planet’s turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years.

Credit:
NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley)
Music: Konstantino Polizois
Duration: 40 seconds
Release Date: August 12, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Jupiter #Planet #Atmosphere #GreatRedSpot #Visualization #SolarSystem #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education #Video

Global Model of Jupiter

Global Model of Jupiter
This three-dimensional model of Jupiter was computer-generated from a new global map of the planet that was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 on June 27, 2019, when the planet was 644 million kilometers from Earth.

Credit:
NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley), M. Kornmesser
Duration: 24 seconds
Release Date: August 8, 2019



#NASA #Hubble #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Jupiter #Planet #Atmosphere #GreatRedSpot #Visualization #SolarSystem #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education #Video

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot | Hubblecast

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot | Hubblecast
This video highlights Jupiter’s trademark spot and observations made of the feature by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope that demonstrate that the spot has shrunk over time.

Credits:
Directed by: Bethany Downer.
Editing: Nico Bartmann.
Web and technical support: Mathias André and Raquel Yumi Shida.
Written by: Bethany Downer
Music: John Stanford (
www.nigelstanford.com) – Far Centaurus
Footage and photos: ESA, NASA, A. Simon, M.H. Wong, M. Kornmesser, H. Hammel, R. Beebe.
Duration: 1 minute, 30 seconds
Release Date: August 8, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Jupiter #Planet #Atmosphere #GreatRedSpot #GRS #SolarSystem #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education #Video

Jupiter: A New Portrait | Hubble

Jupiter: A New Portrait | Hubble
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals the intricate, detailed beauty of Jupiter’s clouds in this new image taken on June 27, 2019. It features the planet’s trademark Great Red Spot and a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in the planet’s turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years.

Among the most striking features in the image are the rich colors of the clouds moving toward the Great Red Spot. This huge anticyclonic storm is roughly the diameter of Earth and is rolling counterclockwise between two bands of clouds that are moving in opposite directions toward it.

As with previous images of Jupiter taken by Hubble, and other observations from telescopes on the ground, the new image confirms that the huge storm which has raged on Jupiter’s surface for at least 150 years continues to shrink. The reason for this is still unknown so Hubble will continue to observe Jupiter in the hope that scientists will be able to solve this stormy riddle. Much smaller storms appear on Jupiter as white or brown ovals that can last as little as a few hours or stretch on for centuries.

The worm-shaped feature located south of the Great Red Spot is a cyclone, a vortex spinning in the opposite direction to that in which the Great Red Spot spins. Researchers have observed cyclones with a wide variety of different appearances across the planet. The two white oval features are anticyclones, similar to small versions of the Great Red Spot.

The Hubble image also highlights Jupiter’s distinct parallel cloud bands. These bands consist of air flowing in opposite directions at various latitudes. They are created by differences in the thickness and height of the ammonia ice clouds; the lighter bands rise higher and have thicker clouds than the darker bands. The different concentrations are kept separate by fast winds which can reach speeds of up to 650 kilometers per hour.

These observations of Jupiter form part of the Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, which began in 2014. This initiative allows Hubble to dedicate time each year to observing the outer planets and provides scientists with access to a collection of maps, which helps them to understand not only the atmospheres of the giant planets in the Solar System, but also the atmosphere of our own planet and of the planets in other planetary systems.

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

Note:
This image was captured by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, when the planet was 644 million kilometers from Earth.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley)
Release Date: August 8, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #ESA #NASA #Astronomy #Space #Jupiter #Planet #Atmosphere #SolarSystem #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education

Friday, September 06, 2019

Keeping an eye on Hurricane Dorian from Space | This Week @NASA

Keeping an eye on Hurricane Dorian | This Week @NASA
Sept. 6, 2019: Keeping an eye on Hurricane Dorian, the next crew headed to the International Space Station, and a better understanding of Sun-driven space weather . . . a few of the stories to tell you about—This Week at NASA!

Credit: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
Duration: 2 minutes, 57 seconds
Release Date: September 6, 2019



#NASA #Space #ISS #Science #Exploration #Dorian #Hurricane #HurricaneDorian #Artemis #Mars #Moon #Astronauts #ChristinaKoch #NickHague #AndrewMorgan #Expedition60 #Human #Spaceflight #SpaceX #Spacecraft #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #Video

NASA's Space to Ground: Category 5 | Week of Sept. 6, 2019

NASA's Space to Ground: Category 5 | Week of Sept. 6, 2019
NASA's Space to Ground is your weekly update on what's happening aboard the International Space Station.

As the week near its close, the crew of Expedition 60 caught up on maintenance activities while also continuing science investigations integral for the future of space exploration to destinations further into the solar system.

ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Luca Parmitano performed servicing to the EXPRESS Rack located in the Columbus lab of the International Space Station. The EXPRESS Rack is instrumental in supporting science experiments, providing structural interfaces for power, data, cooling water and more to facilitate investigations in microgravity.

NASA astronauts Nick Hague and Andrew Morgan continued examinations for Fluid Shifts, conducting remotely guided ultrasounds to track the movement of fluids within the body. Spread out over several weeks, the various measurements investigate if long-duration spaceflight can cause severe and lasting physical damage to an astronaut’s eyes. Aboard the orbiting laboratory, a Lower Body Negative Pressure device is being evaluated as a possible intervention for any harmful effects.

Flight Engineer Christina Koch, meanwhile, spent time on Rodent Research habitat cleaning and feeding protocols. Such experiments, as a byproduct of learning how microgravity affects animals, provides relevant insight to human space exploration, basic biology and knowledge that can positively impact human health on Earth.

Crew members performed scheduled maintenance on the Space Moss investigation — a plant-growth experiment attached to the Cell Biology Experiment Facility incubator. Moss, tiny plants without roots, need only a small area to thrive, and thus have potential in space far beyond low-Earth orbit, like on future Moon or Martian bases.

The countdown is on for cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Alexey Ovchinin, who will wrap up packing the Soyuz MS-14 with gear before the spaceship returns to Earth Friday, Sept. 6. Viewers can watch NASA Television as it follows the undocking of the unpiloted vehicle, which begins at 1:45 p.m. EDT for a scheduled undocking at 2:14 p.m. The vehicle is anticipated to land at 5:34 p.m. in Kazakhstan, but with no NASA TV coverage.

Learn more about the important research being operated on Station:
https://www.nasa.gov/iss-science

For more information about STEM on Station:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem_on_station/

Credit: NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC)
Duration: 2 minutes, 27 seconds
Release Date: September 6, 2019


#NASA #Space #ISS #Science #Hurricane #HurricaneDorian #Soyuz #Research #Microgravity #Astronauts #ChristinaKoch #NickHague #AndrewMorgan #ESA #LucaParmitano #Italia #Italy #Cosmonauts #AlexeyOvchinin #AlexanderSkvortsov #Russia #Россия #Expedition60 #Human #Spaceflight #Spacecraft #JSC #Houston #Texas #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #Video

Wednesday, September 04, 2019

Mars: Avalanche Season [Video] | NASA MRO

Avalanche captured from Mars orbit by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft
Every spring the sun shines on the side of the stack of layers at the North Pole of Mars known as the north polar layered deposits. The warmth destabilizes the ice and blocks break loose.

When they reach the bottom of the more than 500 meter tall cliff face, the blocks kick up a cloud of dust. The layers beneath are different colors and textures depending on the amount of dust mixed with ice.

Imagery captured 318.2 km (197.8 miles) above the planet's surface
Black and white images are 5 km across; enhanced color images are 1 km.

Mars Location:
Latitude (centered)
83.796°
Longitude (East)
237.006°

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colorado.

Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Narration: Tre Gibbs (www.tregibbs.com)
Duration: 29 seconds
Capture Date: May 29, 2019
Release Date: September 3, 2019


#NASA #Mars #Space #Astronomy #Science #Planet #Avalanche #NorthPole #Geology #Landscape #Terrain #Geoscience #RedPlanet #MRO #Reconnaissance #Orbiter #Spacecraft #HiRISE #Camera #JPL #University #Arizona #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #Video

Mars: Avalanche Season | NASA MRO

Mars: Avalanche Season | NASA MRO
Avalanche captured from Mars orbit by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft
Every spring the sun shines on the side of the stack of layers at the North Pole of Mars known as the north polar layered deposits. The warmth destabilizes the ice and blocks break loose.

When they reach the bottom of the more than 500 meter tall cliff face, the blocks kick up a cloud of dust. The layers beneath are different colors and textures depending on the amount of dust mixed with ice.

Image captured 318.2 km (197.8 miles) above the planet's surface

Mars Location:
Latitude (centered)
83.796°
Longitude (East)
237.006°

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colorado.

Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Image Date: May 29, 2019
Release Date: September 3, 2019

#NASA #Mars #Space #Astronomy #Science #Planet #Avalanche#NorthPole #Geology #Landscape #Terrain #Geoscience #RedPlanet #MRO#Reconnaissance #Orbiter #Spacecraft #HiRISE #Camera #JPL #University#Arizona #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

Tuesday, September 03, 2019

Three Storms Brewing as Hurricane Season Heats Up

Three Storms Brewing as Hurricane Season Heats Up

While Hurricane Dorian lashed the Bahamas throughout Labor Day weekend, two other storms were brewing — one in the Atlantic, and another in the Eastern Pacific. In this GOES West view, captured at 1:20 p.m. EDT on Sept. 3, 2019, you can see all three storms.

Dorian, still a daunting Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph, is threatening the U.S. mainland as the storm slowly moves to the northwest. Hurricane warnings are in effect from Jupiter Inlet to Ponte Vedra Beach in Florida, as well as from north of Edisto Beach to South Santee River in South Carolina. Although Dorian isn’t forecast to make landfall along the East Coast, with the storm’s increasing size, any deviation to the left of the track could bring hurricane-force winds to portions of Florida’s east coast, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

As Dorian treks along the coast, Tropical Storm Fernand is slowly strengthening in the Gulf of Mexico. This storm, which currently has maximum sustained winds of nearly 40 mph, is forecast to reach the northeastern coast of Mexico late Tuesday or early Wednesday. A tropical storm warning is now in effect for Barra del Tordo to the mouth of the Rio Grande River, according to the latest NHC update.

Although Hurricane Juliette, a Category 3 storm as of 2 p.m. on Sept. 3, 2019, is packing wind speeds near 125 mph, this storm isn’t forecast to affect land. While the storm may gain some strength throughout the day, the NHC forecast shows the storm beginning to slowly fizzle by late Wednesday.

Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Release Date: September 3, 2019

#NASA #NOAA #Space #Satellite #Science #Earth #HurricaneDorian#Hurricane #Dorian #HurricaneJuliette #Tropical #Storm #Fernand #Atlantic#Pacific #Ocean #Florida #Bahamas #Weather #Meteorology #GOESWest#UnitedStates #STEM #Education

Dorian Pulling Away from Northwest Bahamas, Lashing Florida's East Coast

Dorian Pulling Away from Northwest Bahamas, Lashing Florida's East Coast
Dorian is tied for the strongest Atlantic hurricane landfall on record with the 1935 Labor Day hurricane by having maximum sustained winds of 185 mph (295 km/h), according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
Get the latest forecast here:
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/#dorian

This GeoColor-enhanced imagery was created by NOAA's partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere. The GOES East geostationary satellite, also known as GOES-16, provides coverage of the Western Hemisphere, including the United States, the Atlantic Ocean and the eastern Pacific. The satellite's high-resolution imagery provides optimal viewing of severe weather events, including thunderstorms, tropical storms, and hurricanes.

Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Release Date: September 3, 2019


#NASA #NOAA #Space #Satellite #Science #Earth #HurricaneDorian #Hurricane #Dorian #Storm #Atlantic #Ocean #Florida #Weather #Meteorology #GOESEast #CIRA #Geocolor #Goddard #GSFC #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

Monday, September 02, 2019

The Eye of Hurricane Dorian | International Space Station

The Eye of Hurricane Dorian | International Space Station
". . . You can feel the power of the storm when you stare into its eye from above. Stay safe everyone!"
—NASA Astronaut Nick Hague (ISS Expedition 60)
Sept. 2, 2019: In its 11:00 a.m. EDT advisory, the National Hurricane Center said Dorian was almost stationary, moving toward the west at just 1 mile an hour just over 100 miles east of West Palm Beach, Florida, packing catastrophic sustained winds of 155 miles an hour.

A slow westward to west-northwestward motion is forecast during the next day or so, followed by a gradual turn toward the northwest and north. On this track, the core of extremely dangerous Hurricane Dorian will continue to pound Grand Bahama Island through much of today and tonight. The hurricane will move dangerously close to the east coast of Florida tonight through Wednesday evening and dangerously close to the Georgia and South Carolina coasts Wednesday night and Thursday.

Currently, Dorian is a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Although gradual weakening is forecast, Dorian is expected to remain a powerful hurricane during the next couple of days while moving on a possible track up the southeastern U.S. seaboard.

Credit: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Johnson Space Center (JSC)
Release Date: September 2, 2019

#NASA #Earth #Science #Space #ISS #Hurricane #Dorian #HurricaneDorian #Eye #Astronaut #NickHague #Expedition60 #Caribbean #Sea #Atlantic #Ocean #Bahamas #Florida #UnitedStates #Weather #Storm #Precipitation #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming #Environment #Planet #STEM #Education

Hurricane Dorian - Sept. 2, 2019 | International Space Station

Hurricane Dorian - Sept. 2, 2019 | International Space Station
Cameras outside the International Space Station captured views at 11:27 a.m. Eastern time September 2 of Hurricane Dorian from 260 miles in altitude as it churned over the over the northwestern Bahamas. In its 11:00 a.m. EDT advisory, the National Hurricane Center said Dorian was almost stationary, moving toward the west at just 1 mile an hour just over 100 miles east of West Palm Beach, Florida, packing catastrophic sustained winds of 155 miles an hour.

A slow westward to west-northwestward motion is forecast during the next day or so, followed by a gradual turn toward the northwest and north. On this track, the core of extremely dangerous Hurricane Dorian will continue to pound Grand Bahama Island through much of today and tonight. The hurricane will move dangerously close to the east coast of Florida tonight through Wednesday evening and dangerously close to the Georgia and South Carolina coasts Wednesday night and Thursday.

Currently, Dorian is a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Although gradual weakening is forecast, Dorian is expected to remain a powerful hurricane during the next couple of days while moving on a possible track up the southeastern U.S. seaboard.

Credit: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
Duration: 3 minutes, 11 seconds
Release Date: September 2, 2019


#NASA #Earth #Science #Space #ISS #Hurricane #Dorian#HurricaneDorian #Caribbean #Sea #Atlantic #Ocean #Bahamas #Florida#UnitedStates #Weather #Storm #Precipitation #Safety #Alert #Warning#ClimateChange #GlobalWarming #Environment #Planet #STEM#Education #Video

Galaxy NGC 3351: Caught in the Act | European Southern Observatory

Galaxy NGC 3351: Caught in the Act | ESO
NGC 3351, also known as Messier 95, was first discovered in 1781 by Pierre Méchain, a French astronomer and surveyor who worked alongside Charles Messier. NGC 3351 is a type of galaxy known as a barred spiral galaxy and it is located in the constellation of Leo (The Lion).

New observations of this object have shown stellar feedback in action. Stellar feedback is the process of redistributing energy into the interstellar medium (the space in between the stars) within star-forming galaxies. In this particular galaxy, star formation is occurring in the ring surrounding the galaxy nucleus at such a violent rate that massive bubbles of hot gas can actually be seen being ejected. This ejected gas can then contribute (both positively and negatively) to ongoing star formation within the galaxy.

The data for this observation were taken with ALMA, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Telescope, showing once again that scientific collaboration across multiple facilities can produce some wonderful results.

Credit: European Southern Observatory (ESO)/ R. Leaman/ D. Gadotti/ K. Sandstrom/ D. Calzetti
Release Date: September 2, 2019


#ESO #Hubble #ESA #NASA #Astronomy #Space #Galaxy #Spiral#Barred #NGC3351 #Messier95 #Leo #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope#VLT #ALMA #Observatory #Chile #Europe #STEM #Education

Galaxy UGC 685 | Hubble Space Telescope

Galaxy UGC 685 | Hubble Space Telescope
Distance: 15 million light years
This Picture of the Week shows a dwarf galaxy named UGC 685. Such galaxies are small and contain just a tiny fraction of the number of stars in a galaxy like the Milky Way. Dwarf galaxies often show a hazy structure, an ill-defined shape, and an appearance somewhat akin to a swarm or cloud of stars—and UGC 685 is no exception to this. Classified as an SAm galaxy—a type of unbarred spiral galaxy—it is located about 15 million light-years from Earth.

These data were gathered under the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) Program, the sharpest and most comprehensive ultraviolet survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe.

LEGUS is imaging 50 spiral and dwarf galaxies in our cosmic neighborhood in multiple colors using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3. The survey is picking apart the structures of these galaxies and resolving their constituent stars, clusters, groups, and other stellar associations. Star formation plays a huge role in shaping its host galaxy; by exploring these targets in detail via both new observations and archival Hubble data, LEGUS will shed light on how stars form and cluster together, how these clusters evolve, how a star’s formation affects its surroundings, and how stars explode at the end of their lives.

Credit:
ESA/Hubble & NASA; the LEGUS team, B. Tully, D. Calzetti
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)
Release Date: September 2, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #UGC685 #Dwarf #Unbarred #Spiral #Pisces #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #ESA #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education

Sunday, September 01, 2019

Earth Boat Lights & Starlight | International Space Station

Earth Boat Lights & Starlight | International Space Station
Did you see the lightning flashes over the ocean?

The orange hue enveloping Earth is known as airglow—diffuse bands of light that stretch 50 to 400 miles into our atmosphere.

Airglow occurs when atoms and molecules in the upper atmosphere, excited by sunlight, emit light in order to shed their excess energy. Or, it can happen when atoms and molecules that have been ionized by sunlight collide with and capture a free electron. In both cases, they eject a particle of light—called a photon—in order to relax again. The phenomenon is similar to auroras, but where auroras are driven by high-energy particles originating from the solar wind, airglow is energized by day-to-day solar radiation.

Original timelapse by Riccardo Rossi (ISAA)

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
Raw imagery courtesy of Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth: http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov

Timelapse HD 1080p video
Credit: AstronautiCAST/JSC
Capture Date: August 4, 2019
Release Date: August 7, 2019
Duration: 51 seconds

Music: "Cinematic Club Atmosphere" by realbustermedia
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

#NASA #Space #Astronomy #Earth #ISS #Planet #Atmosphere #Lightning#Stars #Ships #Maritime #Spacecraft #Astronauts #Expedition60 #Night#Photography #Art #Science #Video #Timelapse #OrbitalPerspective#OverviewEffect #AstronautiCAST

Hurricane Dorian | NOAA Satellite

Hurricane Dorian | NOAA Satellite
NOAA's GOES East weather satellite captured this GeoColor view of Hurricane Dorian, a powerful Category 5 storm. Its maximum winds have increased to near 175 mph with gusts over 200 mph.

GeoColor is a multispectral product composed of True Color (using a simulated green component) during the daytime, and an Infrared product that uses bands 7 and 13 at night. During the day, the imagery looks approximately as it would appear when viewed with human eyes from space.

Geocolor was developed at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and STAR's Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch (RAMMB).

Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/CIRA
Capture Date: September 1, 2019


#NASA #NOAA #Space #Satellite #Science #Earth #HurricaneDorian#Hurricane #Dorian #Storm #Atlantic #Ocean #Florida #Weather#Meteorology #GOESEast #CIRA #Geocolor #Goddard #GSFC#UnitedStates #STEM #Education 

Hurricane Dorian | International Space Station

Hurricane Dorian | International Space Station
Views of Hurricane Dorian (Category 5) on September 1, 2019
Cameras outside the International Space Station captured views on September 1 of Hurricane Dorian from 260 miles in altitude at 12:16 p.m. Eastern time as it churned over the Atlantic Ocean over the northern Bahamas. The storm, which is moving in a westerly direction with sustained winds of 180 miles an hour, is a dangerous Category 5 hurricane, carrying the strongest winds in recorded history for the northwestern Bahamas. The National Hurricane Center said in its 11 a.m. EDT advisory that Dorian is inflicting catastrophic damage to the Abacos and Grand Bahama Islands. Dorian is forecast to approach the east coast of Florida before taking a possible track up the southeastern U.S. seaboard later this week.

Credit: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) 
Duration: 4 minutes, 34 seconds
Release Date: September 1, 2019

#NASA #Earth #Science #Space #ISS #Hurricane #Dorian #HurricaneDorian #Caribbean#Sea #Atlantic #Ocean #Bahamas #Florida #UnitedStates #Weather #Storm#Precipitation #Safety #Alert #Warning #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming#Environment #Planet #STEM #Education #Video

Skywatching: What's Up for September 2019 | NASA

Skywatching: What's Up for September 2019 | NASA

In this month's sky, look for lovely crescent Moons at the start and end of the month. The September equinox brings the beginning of fall in the Northern Hemisphere. And Mars is at solar conjunction, meaning it has disappeared from night skies! (When will it return?)

Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What's Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at https://go.nasa.gov/2Hx3bMn

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Duration: 2 minutes, 47 seconds
Release Date: August 29, 2019



#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Skywatching #Moon #Planets #Mars#Sun #SolarSystem #Stars #Constellations #MilkyWay #Galaxy #JPL#Pasadena #California #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #Video