Thursday, December 01, 2022

What's Up for December 2022 | Skywatching Tips from NASA

What's Up for December 2022 | Skywatching Tips from NASA

What are some skywatching highlights in December 2022?

The Moon sweeps past Jupiter twice this month, and actually covers Mars completely, in an event called an occultation, on Dec. 7. The event is visible across the U.S., except for the Southeast and East Coast, where the Moon will graze closely past Mars. And throughout the month, you can find Pegasus, the winged stallion, high overhead in the south.

0:00 Intro

0:11 Moon & planet highlights

0:38 Occultation: Mars disappears

1:54 The constellation Pegasus

3:12 December Moon phases


Credit: NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

Duration: 3 minutes, 33 seconds

Release Date: December 1, 2022

#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Skywatching #Earth #Moon #Planets #Jupiter #Mars #SolarSystem #Stars #Pegasus #Constellations #MilkyWay #Galaxy #JPL #California #Skywatching #UnitedStates #Canada #Mexico #NorthernHemisphere #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Tonight's Sky: December 2022 (Northern Hemisphere)

Tonight's Sky: December 2022 (Northern Hemisphere)

Step outside on a cold December night when the stars shine bright to find the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, and Cepheus. They will help you locate a binary star system, a fan-shaped open star cluster, and a variable star. Stay tuned for space-based views of a ragged spiral galaxy, an open star cluster, and an edge-on galaxy. 


“Tonight’s Sky” is a monthly video of constellations you can observe in the night sky. The series is produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute, home of science operations for the Hubble Space Telescope, in partnership with NASA’s Universe of Learning.


Credit: Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) 

Duration: 4 minutes, 39 seconds

Release Date: November 29, 2022


#NASA #Space #Astronomy #Science #Earth #Stars #BigDipper #Cassiopeia #OpenStarCluster #VariableStar #Cepheus #Constellations #Galaxy #MilkyWay #Planets #SolarSystem #Skywatching #STScI #UnitedStates #Canada #Mexico #NorthernHemisphere #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Globular Clusters: Stellar Pockets | Hubble Space Telescope

Globular Clusters: Stellar Pockets | Hubble Space Telescope

When the Hubble Space Telescope launched, one of its main goals was to learn more about our incredible universe. Using Hubble, astronomers have learned more about globular clusters. Globular clusters are stable, tightly gravitationally bound clusters of tens of thousands to millions of stars found in a wide variety of galaxies. The intense gravitational attraction between the closely packed stars gives globular clusters a regular, spherical shape.

In this video, Dr. Ken Carpenter explains just how amazing these objects are.

For more information, visit https://nasa.gov/hubble


Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center 

Producer & Director: James Leigh

Editor: Lucy Lund

Director of Photography: James Ball

Additional Editing & Photography: Matthew Duncan

Executive Producers: James Leigh & Matthew Duncan

Production & Post: Origin Films 

Video Credits:

Hubble Space Telescope Animation

Credit: M. Kornmesser (ESA/Hubble)

Artist’s Impression of the Black Hole Concentration in NGC 6397 Credit: ESA/Hubble, N. Bartmann

Duration: 3 minutes

Release Date: December 1, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Hubble #Stars #GlobularClusters #BlackHoles #Cosmos #Universe #SpaceTelescope #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #Europe #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Data Sonification of Star Cluster Pismis 24 | Hubble Space Telescope

Data Sonification of Star Cluster Pismis 24 | Hubble Space Telescope

Pismis 24 is a stunning star cluster that lies within the nebula NGC 6357, which resides about 8,000 light-years away. In this sonification of the Hubble image, a top-down scan maps brightness to volume and pitch for both the stars and nebula.  

The stars are assigned to musical pitches played on a classical guitar (brighter stars are louder and higher pitched), and the nebula uses a continuous range of frequencies (brighter regions are louder and higher pitched). Red, green, and blue channels are mapped to low, medium, and high frequency ranges respectively.

The star cluster Pismis 24 lies in the core of the large emission nebula NGC 6357 that extends one degree on the sky in the direction of the Scorpius constellation. Part of the nebula is ionized by the youngest (bluest) heavy stars in Pismis 24. The intense ultraviolet radiation from the blazing stars heats the gas surrounding the cluster and creates a bubble in NGC 6357. The presence of these surrounding gas clouds makes probing into the region even harder.

Recent NASA/European Space Agency Hubble measurements of the star have resolved Pismis 24-1 into two separate stars, and, in doing so, have "halved" its mass to around 100 solar masses.


Credits: 

Image: NASA, European Space Agency and Jesús Maíz Apellániz (Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Spain); Acknowledgment: Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble)

Sonification: SYSTEM Sounds (M. Russo, A. Santaguida)

Duration: 41 seconds

Release Date: November 29, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Hubble #Stars #StarCluster #Pismis24 #Pismis241 #Nebula #EmissionNebula #NGC6357 #Scorpius #Constellation #Cosmos #Universe #SpaceTelescope #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #Europe #STEM #Education #Sonification #HD #Video

Wednesday, November 30, 2022

Merging Galaxy Pair II ZW 96 | James Webb Space Telescope

Merging Galaxy Pair II ZW 96 | James Webb Space Telescope

This video features the chaotic merging galaxies II ZW 96, which have been examined in two distinct wavelengths by the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope and the NASA/European Space Agency/Canadian Space Agency James Webb Space Telescope.

The image shown first was taken by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and gives a view over the visible-light spectrum of this merger, clearly showing the starburst systems that have formed between the two galactic cores with their older stars. 

This view transitions to the new Webb image from the Near-InfraRed Camera instrument, which shines particularly brightly in infrared light. The star-forming regions which have been activated by the galactic tumult are particularly luminous in the infrared, which placed ZW II 96 as one of Webb’s first targets. 


Credit: ESA/Webb, NASA, CSA, L. Armus, A. Evans, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration, N. Bartmann (ESA/Webb)

Duration: 30 seconds

Release Date: Nov. 30, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #Galaxies #IIZW96 #3Delphinus #Constellation #JamesWebb #SpaceTelescope #JWST #Cosmos #Universe #UnfoldTheUniverse #Europe #CSA #Canada #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Zoom into Merging Galaxy Pair II ZW 96 | James Webb Space Telescope

Zoom into Merging Galaxy Pair II ZW 96 | James Webb Space Telescope

This video takes the viewer to space to finish at Webb’s view of the galaxy merger II ZW 96. This pair of galaxies is roughly 500 million light-years from Earth and lies in the constellation Delphinus, close to the celestial equator. As well as the wild swirl of the merging galaxies, a menagerie of background galaxies are dotted throughout the image. 


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)/Webb, NASA, Canadian Space Agency (CSA), L. Armus, A. Evans, SDSS, E. Slawik, N. Risinger, M. Zamani (ESA/Webb), N. Bartmann (ESA/Webb)

Duration: 1 minute

Release Date: Nov. 30, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #Galaxies #IIZW96 #3Delphinus #Constellation #JamesWebb #SpaceTelescope #JWST #Cosmos #Universe #UnfoldTheUniverse #Europe #CSA #Canada #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Pan of Merging Galaxy Pair II ZW 96 | James Webb Space Telescope

Pan of Merging Galaxy Pair II ZW 96 | James Webb Space Telescope

A merging galaxy pair cavort in this image captured by the NASA/European Space Agency/Canadian Space Agency James Webb Space Telescope. This pair of galaxies, known to astronomers as II ZW 96, is roughly 500 million light-years from Earth and lies in the constellation Delphinus, close to the celestial equator. As well as the wild swirl of the merging galaxies, a menagerie of background galaxies are dotted throughout the image. 

Image Description: A galaxy merger lies in the center of this image. The cores of the galaxies, colored blue, are below-center. They are surrounded by red star-forming regions which stretch up through and above the center. Faint yellow diffraction spikes appear in the middle. The lower galaxy is a mostly regular spiral shape, while the upper galaxy has been distorted heavily. The background is black, and covered with many tiny galaxies throughout the scene.


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)/Webb, NASA, Canadian Space Agency (CSA), L. Armus, A. Evans, N. Bartmann (ESA/Webb)  

Duration: 30 seconds

Release Date: Nov. 30, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #Galaxies #IIZW96 #3Delphinus #Constellation #JamesWebb #SpaceTelescope #JWST #Cosmos #Universe #UnfoldTheUniverse #Europe #CSA #Canada #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Merging Galaxy Pair II ZW 96 | James Webb Space Telescope

Merging Galaxy Pair II ZW 96 | James Webb Space Telescope

A merging galaxy pair cavort in this image captured by the NASA/European Space Agency/Canadian Space Agency James Webb Space Telescope. This pair of galaxies, known to astronomers as II ZW 96, is roughly 500 million light-years from Earth and lies in the constellation Delphinus, close to the celestial equator. As well as the wild swirl of the merging galaxies, a menagerie of background galaxies are dotted throughout the image.

Image Description: A galaxy merger lies in the center of this image. The cores of the galaxies, colored blue, are below-center. They are surrounded by red star-forming regions which stretch up through and above the center. Faint yellow diffraction spikes appear in the middle. The lower galaxy is a mostly regular spiral shape, while the upper galaxy has been distorted heavily. The background is black, and covered with many tiny galaxies throughout the scene.

The two galaxies are in the process of merging and as a result have a chaotic, disturbed shape. The bright cores of the two galaxies are connected by bright tendrils of star-forming regions, and the spiral arms of the lower galaxy have been twisted out of shape by the gravitational perturbation of the galaxy merger. It is these star-forming regions that made II ZW 96 such a tempting target for Webb; the galaxy pair is particularly bright at infrared wavelengths thanks to the presence of the star formation.

This observation is from a collection of Webb measurements delving into the details of galactic evolution, in particular in nearby Luminous Infrared Galaxies such as II ZW 96. These galaxies, as the name suggests, are particularly bright at infrared wavelengths, with luminosities more than 100 billion times that of the Sun. An international team of astronomers proposed a study of complex galactic ecosystems—including the merging galaxies in II ZW 96—to put Webb through its paces soon after the telescope was commissioned. Their chosen targets have already been observed with ground-based telescopes and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which will provide astronomers with insights into Webb’s ability to unravel the details of complex galactic environments.

Webb captured this merging galaxy pair with a pair of its cutting-edge instruments; NIRCam—the Near-InfraRed Camera—and MIRI, the Mid-InfraRed Instrument. If you are interested in exploring the differences between Hubble and Webb’s observations of II ZW 96, you can do so here.

MIRI was contributed by ESA and NASA, with the instrument designed and built by a consortium of nationally funded European Institutes (The MIRI European Consortium) in partnership with JPL and the University of Arizona. The University of Arizona also provided the NIRCam instrument.


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)/Webb, NASA & CSA, L. Armus, A. Evans

Release Date: Nov. 30, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #Galaxies #IIZW96 #3Delphinus #Constellation #JamesWebb #SpaceTelescope #JWST #Cosmos #Universe #UnfoldTheUniverse #Europe #CSA #Canada #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

Is There Water on the Moon? We Asked a NASA Scientist

Is There Water on the Moon? We Asked a NASA Scientist

Is there water on the Moon? Yes! But you won’t find pools of liquid H2O on the lunar surface— water on the Moon is mostly in the form of ice. 

Harvesting this water is a critical component of future human deep space exploration, which is why our golf cart-sized VIPER, or the Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover, will be traveling to the Moon’s South Pole to search for ice and other potential resources to determine where they came from. 

Explore more about this first-of-its-kind rover: https://www.nasa.gov/viper

 

Credit: NASA

Producers: Jessica Wilde, Scott Bednar

Editor: Seth Robinson 

Duration: 1 minute, 39 seconds

Release Date: Nov. 30, 2022


#NASA #Space #Moon #Water #Ice #VIPER #Rover #Artemis #DeepSpace #MoonToMars #JourneyToMars #Science #Engineering #Technology #Exploration #SolarSystem #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Launch Camera Footage | NASA's Artemis I Moon Rocket

Launch Camera Footage | NASA's Artemis I Moon Rocket

Experience the Artemis I rocket launch from engine ignition to Orion's separation on its journey to the Moon. NASA’s Space Launch System rocket carrying the Orion spacecraft launched on the Artemis I flight test, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022, from Launch Complex 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA’s Artemis I mission is the first integrated flight test of the agency’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, and ground systems. 

The first in a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I is an uncrewed flight test that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration. It will demonstrate NASA's commitment and capability to extend human existence to the Moon and beyond. Orion is completing a 25-day test of all key systems. It will travel 280,000 miles from Earth, thousands of miles beyond the Moon. Orion will stay in space longer than any ship for astronauts has done without docking to a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before.

On the Artemis III Mission, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of color on the surface of the Moon, paving the way for a long-term lunar presence and serving as a steppingstone on the way to Mars. 

Learn more about Artemis I at:

Credit: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Duration: 1 minute, 42 seconds

Release Date: Nov. 29, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Space #Earth #Moon #Artemis #ArtemisI #SLS #Rocket #Orion #Spacecraft #DeepSpace #MoonToMars #JourneyToMars #Science #Engineering #Technology #Exploration #HumanSpaceflight #SolarSystem #UnitedStates #Europe #International #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Leaving Earth: Upper Stage Separation Burn | NASA's Artemis I Orion Spacecraft

Leaving Earth: Upper Stage Separation Burn | NASA's Artemis I Orion Spacecraft

Shortly after separating from the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS) less than two hours into the Artemis I mission on Nov. 16, 2022, the thrusters on Orion’s service module conducted the upper stage separation burn, distancing the spacecraft from the expended ICPS.

The first in a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I is an uncrewed flight test that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration. It will demonstrate NASA's commitment and capability to extend human existence to the Moon and beyond. Orion is completing a 25-day test of all key systems. It will travel 280,000 miles from Earth, thousands of miles beyond the Moon. Orion will stay in space longer than any ship for astronauts has done without docking to a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before.


On the Artemis III Mission, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of color on the surface of the Moon, paving the way for a long-term lunar presence and serving as a steppingstone on the way to Mars. 


Learn more about Artemis I at:

https://www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis

https://www.nasa.gov/artemis-1


Credit: NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC)

Duration: 6 minutes

Capture Date: Nov. 16, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Space #Earth #Moon #Artemis #ArtemisI #Orion #Spacecraft #DeepSpace #MoonToMars #JourneyToMars #Science #Engineering #Technology #Exploration #HumanSpaceflight #SolarSystem #UnitedStates #Europe #International #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Tuesday, November 29, 2022

A Family Portrait: The Earth, The Moon & Orion | NASA's Artemis I Mission

A Family Portrait: The Earth, The Moon & Orion | NASA's Artemis I Mission


NASA's Artemis I Orion spacecraft looks back at the Earth and the Moon on Nov. 28, 2022, after surpassing the maximum distance of any other spacecraft built for humans. Orion is continuing to orbit the Moon in a distant retrograde orbit and will splash down in the Pacific Ocean on December 11, 2022.

The first in a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I is an uncrewed flight test that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration. It will demonstrate NASA's commitment and capability to extend human existence to the Moon and beyond. Orion is completing a 25-day test of all key systems. It will travel 280,000 miles from Earth, thousands of miles beyond the Moon. Orion will stay in space longer than any ship for astronauts has done without docking to a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before.

On the Artemis III Mission, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of color on the surface of the Moon, paving the way for a long-term lunar presence and serving as a steppingstone on the way to Mars. 

Learn more about Artemis I at:

Credit: NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC)/Thomas Appéré
Thomas' Flickr Page: http://bit.ly/3AQuRaD 
Capture Date: Nov. 28, 2022

#NASA #ESA #Space #Earth #Moon #Artemis #ArtemisI #Orion #Spacecraft #DeepSpace #MoonToMars #JourneyToMars #Science #Engineering #Technology #Exploration #HumanSpaceflight #SolarSystem #UnitedStates #Europe #International #STEM #Education

Viewing The Moon & Earth | NASA's Artemis I Orion Spacecraft

Viewing The Moon & Earth | NASA's Artemis I Orion Spacecraft


In this video taken on flight day 14 of the 25.5 day Artemis I mission, Orion looks back at the Earth and the Moon after surpassing the maximum distance of any other spacecraft built for humans. Orion is continuing to orbit the Moon in a distant retrograde orbit and will splash down in the Pacific Ocean on December 11, 2022.

The first in a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I is an uncrewed flight test that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration. It will demonstrate NASA's commitment and capability to extend human existence to the Moon and beyond. Orion is completing a 25-day test of all key systems. It will travel 280,000 miles from Earth, thousands of miles beyond the Moon. Orion will stay in space longer than any ship for astronauts has done without docking to a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before.

On the Artemis III Mission, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of color on the surface of the Moon, paving the way for a long-term lunar presence and serving as a steppingstone on the way to Mars. 

Learn more about Artemis I at:

https://www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis

https://www.nasa.gov/artemis-1


Credit: NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC)

Duration: 5 minutes, 39 seconds

Capture Date: Nov. 28, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Space #Earth #Moon #Artemis #ArtemisI #Orion #Spacecraft #DeepSpace #MoonToMars #JourneyToMars #Science #Engineering #Technology #Exploration #HumanSpaceflight #SolarSystem #UnitedStates #Europe #International #STEM #Education #HD #Video

What would NASA's Artemis I Scientists take with them to Space?

What would NASA's Artemis I Scientists take with them to Space?

Under the Biological Experiment-01 (BioExpt-01) investigation aboard Artemis I, NASA’s Biological & Physical Sciences Division is studying the effects of deep space stressors on four organisms: yeast cells, plant seeds, algae, and fungi. In this video, the Principal Investigators for each of these studies describe what they would take with them to space!


Credit: ScienceAtNASA

Duration: 2 minutes, 13 seconds

Release Date: Nov. 28, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Space #Earth #Moon #Artemis #ArtemisI #Orion #Spacecraft #DeepSpace #MoonToMars #JourneyToMars #Science #Scientists #Engineering #Technology #Exploration #HumanSpaceflight #SolarSystem #UnitedStates #Europe #International #STEM #Education #HD #Video

The Earth and The Moon | NASA's Artemis I Orion Spacecraft

The Earth and The Moon | NASA's Artemis I Orion Spacecraft





On flight day 13, Nov. 28, 2022, Orion continues to distance itself from Earth and the Moon, looking back on our home planet and lunar neighbor as the Moon prepares to eclipse the Earth as seen from Orion.

NASA’s uncrewed Orion spacecraft reached the farthest distance from Earth it will travel during the Artemis I mission—268,563 miles from our home planet—just after 3 p.m. CST. The spacecraft also captured imagery of Earth and the Moon together throughout the day, including of the Moon appearing to eclipse Earth. 

Reaching the halfway point of the mission on Flight Day 13 of a 25.5 day mission, the spacecraft remains in healthy condition as it continues its journey in distant retrograde orbit, an approximately six-day leg of its larger mission thousands of miles beyond the Moon.  

The first in a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I is an uncrewed flight test that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration. It will demonstrate NASA's commitment and capability to extend human existence to the Moon and beyond. Orion is completing a 25-day test of all key systems. It will travel 280,000 miles from Earth, thousands of miles beyond the Moon. Orion will stay in space longer than any ship for astronauts has done without docking to a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before.


On the Artemis III Mission, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of color on the surface of the Moon, paving the way for a long-term lunar presence and serving as a steppingstone on the way to Mars. 


Learn more about Artemis I at:

https://www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis

https://www.nasa.gov/artemis-1


Credit: NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC)

Capture Date: Nov. 28, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Space #Earth #Moon #Artemis #ArtemisI #Orion #Spacecraft #DeepSpace #MoonToMars #JourneyToMars #Science #Engineering #Technology #Exploration #HumanSpaceflight #SolarSystem #UnitedStates #Europe #International #STEM #Education

Panning across the Unusual Galaxy Merger Arp-Madore 417-391 | Hubble

Panning across the Unusual Galaxy Merger Arp-Madore 417-391 | Hubble

The galaxy merger Arp-Madore 417-391 steals the spotlight in this image from the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope. The Arp-Madore catalog is a collection of particularly peculiar galaxies spread throughout the southern sky, and includes a collection of subtly interacting galaxies as well as more spectacular colliding galaxies. Arp-Madore 417-391, which lies around 670 million light-years away in the constellation Eridanus in the southern celestial hemisphere, is one such galactic collision. The two galaxies have been distorted by gravity and twisted into a colossal ring, leaving the cores of the two galaxies nestled side by side.

Image Description: Two galaxies right of center form a ring shape. The ring is narrow and blue, and the cores of the two galaxies form a bulge on the ring’s side. A bright, orange star lies above the ring. Two smaller spiral galaxies appear left of center, as well as a few stars. The background is black and speckled with very small stars and galaxies.

Hubble used its Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) to capture this scene—the instrument is optimized to hunt for galaxies and galaxy clusters in the ancient Universe. Hubble’s ACS has been contributing to scientific discovery for 20 years, and throughout its lifetime it has been involved in everything from mapping the distribution of dark matter to studying the evolution of galaxy clusters.

This image comes from a selection of Hubble observations designed to create a list of intriguing targets for follow-up observations with the NASA/European Space Agency/Canadian Space Agency James Webb Space Telescope, as well as other ground-based telescopes. Astronomers chose a list of previously unobserved galaxies for Hubble to inspect between other scheduled observations. Over time, this lets astronomers build up a menagerie of interesting galaxies while using Hubble’s limited observing time as fully as possible.


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)/Hubble & NASA, Dark Energy Survey/DOE/FNAL/DECam/CTIO/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA, J. Dalcanton

Duration: 30 seconds

Release Date: Nov. 26, 2022


#NASA #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Hubble #Galaxies #Galaxy #ArpMadore417391 #AM417391 #Eridanus #Constellation #MilkyWayGalaxy #Cosmos #Universe #SpaceTelescope #STScI #GSFC #UnitedStates #Europe #STEM #Education #HD #Video