Wednesday, February 01, 2023

NASA's SpaceX Demo-2 Astronauts Awarded Congressional Space Medals of Honor

NASA's SpaceX Demo-2 Astronauts Awarded Congressional Space Medals of Honor

On Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023, Vice President Kamala Harris awarded former NASA astronauts Douglas Hurley and Robert Behnken the Congressional Space Medal of Honor. Hurley and Behnken received the award for bravery in NASA’s SpaceX Demonstration Mission-2 (Demo-2) to the International Space Station in 2020.

NASA's Commercial Crew Program began a new era of human spaceflight as American astronauts launched from American soil on an American rocket to the International Space Station. Behnken and Hurley flew on SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft, which lifted off on a Falcon 9 rocket on May 30, 2020, from Launch Complex 39A in Florida. This mission was the final flight test for SpaceX, validating the company's crew transportation system, including the launch pad, rocket, spacecraft, and operational capabilities.

Once in orbit, Behnken and Hurley were welcomed aboard the ISS, and became members of the Expedition 63 crew. They performed tests on Crew Dragon in addition to conducting research and other tasks with the space station crew. Upon conclusion of the mission, the Crew Dragon autonomously undocked, re-entered the Earth's atmosphere and splashed down just off Florida's Atlantic Coast. 

Demo-2 was the final step before NASA's Commercial Crew Program certified Crew Dragon for operational, long-duration missions to the space station, enabling NASA to continue important research and technology investigations onboard the station.

To learn more about NASA’s Commercial Crew Program visit: 

https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/commercial/crew/index.html


Credit: NASA

Duration: 2 minutes

Release Date: Jan. 31, 2023


#NASA #Space #Science #Earth #ISS #SpaceX #Astronauts #DouglasHurley #RobertBehnken #HumanSpaceflight #Expedition63 #ElonMusk #CrewDragon #CommercialCrew #LaunchAmerica #Technology #Engineering #KSC #Spaceport #Florida #UnitedStates #History #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Tuesday, January 31, 2023

What's Up for February 2023 | Skywatching Tips from NASA

What's Up for February 2023 | Skywatching Tips from NASA

What are some skywatching highlights in February 2023?

See Jupiter and Venus appear nearer each night, as they head for a close conjunction at the start of March. Use bright stars Capella and Elnath to identify the constellation Auriga, and then find your way to two distant star clusters using Sirius as a guidepost.

0:00 Intro

0:12 Moon & planet highlights

0:47 The constellation Auriga

1:52 Easy-to-find star clusters

3:10 February Moon phases


Skywatching resources from NASA: https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/skywatching

NASA's Night Sky Network: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/


Credit: NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

Duration: 3 minutes, 32 seconds

Release Date: Jan. 31, 2023

#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Skywatching #Earth #Moon #Planets #Venus #Jupiter #Saturn #SolarSystem #Stars #Capella #Elnath #Auriga #StarClusters #Sirius #Constellations #MilkyWayGalaxy #JPL #California #Skywatching #UnitedStates #Canada #Mexico #NorthernHemisphere #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Astra Rocket Launch System 2: First Stage Engine, Mission Duty Cycle Test

Astra Rocket Launch System 2: First Stage Engine, Mission Duty Cycle Test

Footage of a recently completed mission duty cycle (MDC) of a Rocket 4 first stage engine. An MDC is a major engine development milestone for testing hardware reliability. 

"Astra’s mission is to improve life on Earth from space by creating a healthier and more connected planet. Today, Astra offers one of the lowest cost-per-launch dedicated orbital launch services of any operational launch provider in the world, and one of the industry’s first flight-proven electric propulsion systems for satellites, Astra Spacecraft Engine."

"Astra delivered its first commercial launch to low Earth orbit in 2021, making it the fastest company in history to reach this milestone, just five years after it was founded in 2016." 

Visit Astra.com to learn more.


Credit: Astra

Duration: 3 minutes, 11 seconds

Release Date: Jan. 31, 2023


#NASA #Astra #Space #Astronomy #Earth #Satellites #LEO #CommercialSpace #Astra #Rocket #RocketEngine #TestFiring #MDC #Rocket4 #Spacecraft #Technology #Engineering #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

New 2023 Mars Images | NASA's Curiosity & Perseverance Rovers | JPL

New 2023 Mars Images | NASA's Curiosity & Perseverance Rovers | JPL


Mars2020 - sol 690 - Mastcam-Z


MSL - sol 3724 - Mastcam


MSL - sol 3725 - Mastcam


MSL - sol 3725 - MAHLI


MSL - sol 3725 - MAHLI


MSL - sol 3725 - Mastcam


Mars2020 - sol 689 - SuperCam


MSL - sol 3723 - Mastcam

Support FriendsofNASA.org | For more information on NASA's Mars missions, visit: mars.nasa.gov

Celebrating 10 Years+ on Mars! (2012-2023)

Mission Name: Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)

Rover Name: Curiosity

Main Job: To determine if Mars was ever habitable to microbial life. 

Launch: Nov. 6, 2011

Landing Date: Aug. 5, 2012, Gale Crater, Mars


Mission Name: Mars 2020

Rover Name: Perseverance

Main Job: Seek signs of ancient life and collect samples of rock and regolith (broken rock and soil) for possible return to Earth.

Mars Helicopter (Ingenuity)

Launch: July 30, 2020    

Landing: Feb. 18, 2021, Jezero Crater, Mars


Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

Processing: Kevin M. Gill

Image Release Dates: Jan. 22-26, 2023


#NASA #Space #Astronomy #Science #Mars #RedPlanet #Planet #Astrobiology #Geology #CuriosityRover #MSL #MountSharp #GaleCrater #PerseveranceRover #Mars2020 #JezeroCrater #Robotics #Technology #Engineering #JPL #UnitedStates #MoonToMars #CitizenScience #KevinGill #STEM #Education

A Spiral Galaxy Amongst Thousands: LEDA 2046648 | James Webb Space Telescope

A Spiral Galaxy Amongst Thousands: LEDA 2046648 | James Webb Space Telescope

This video highlights the field of stars and galaxies surrounding the spiral galaxy LEDA 2046648. Webb’s NIRCam instrument has picked out a profusion of smaller, more distant galaxies and bright stars around this galaxy, demonstrating the telescope’s impressive resolution in infrared wavelengths. Calibration images such as this one were critical to verify the telescope’s capabilities as it was prepared for science operations, and this one does not disappoint.

Image Description: Many stars and galaxies lie on a dark background, in a variety of colors but mostly shades of orange. Some galaxies are large enough to make out spiral arms. Along the bottom of the frame is a large, detailed spiral galaxy seen at an oblique angle, with another galaxy about one-quarter the size just beneath it. Both have a brightly glowing core, and areas of star formation which light up their spiral arms.


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)/Webb, NASA & Canadian Space Agency (CSA), A. Martel, N. Bartmann  

Duration: 30 seconds

Release Date: Jan. 31, 2023


#NASA #JamesWebbSpaceTelescope #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #LEDA2046648 #Hercules #Constellation #Galaxies #Cosmos #Universe #JWST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #CSA #Canada #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

A Spiral Galaxy Amongst Thousands: LEDA 2046648 | James Webb Space Telescope

A Spiral Galaxy Amongst Thousands: LEDA 2046648 | James Webb Space Telescope

A crowded field of galaxies throngs this image from the NASA/European Space Agency/Canadian Space Agency James Webb Space Telescope, along with bright stars crowned with Webb’s signature six-pointed diffraction spikes. The large spiral galaxy at the base of this image is accompanied by a profusion of smaller, more distant galaxies which range from fully-fledged spirals to mere bright smudges. Named LEDA 2046648, it is situated a little over a billion light-years from Earth, in the constellation Hercules.

Image Description: Many stars and galaxies lie on a dark background, in a variety of colors but mostly shades of orange. Some galaxies are large enough to make out spiral arms. Along the bottom of the frame is a large, detailed spiral galaxy seen at an oblique angle, with another galaxy about one-quarter the size just beneath it. Both have a brightly glowing core, and areas of star formation which light up their spiral arms.

One of Webb’s principle science goals is to observe distant—and hence ancient—galaxies to understand the details of their formation, evolution, and composition. Webb’s keen infrared vision helps the telescope peer back in time, as the light from older, more distant galaxies is redshifted towards infrared wavelengths. Comparing these galactic fossils to modern galaxies will help astronomers understand how galaxies grew to form the structures we see in the universe today. Webb will also probe the chemical composition of thousands of galaxies to shed light on how heavy elements were formed and built up as galaxies evolved. 

To take full advantage of Webb’s potential for galaxy archeology, astronomers and engineers must first calibrate the telescope’s instruments and systems. Each of Webb’s instruments contains a labyrinthine array of mirrors and other optical elements that redirect and focus starlight gathered by Webb’s main mirror. 

This particular observation was part of the commissioning campaign for Webb’s Near-InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS). As well as performing science in its own right, NIRISS supports parallel observations with Webb’s Near-InfraRed Camera (NIRCam). NIRCam captured this galaxy-studded image while NIRISS was observing the white dwarf WD1657+343, a well-studied star. This allows astronomers to interpret and compare data from the two different instruments, and to characterise the performance of NIRISS.


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)/Webb, NASA & Canadian Space Agency (CSA), A. Martel

Release Date: Jan. 31, 2023


#NASA #JamesWebbSpaceTelescope #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #LEDA2046648 #Hercules #Constellation #Galaxies #Cosmos #Universe #JWST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #CSA #Canada #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

Phathom Donald: Hubble Space Telescope Mission Engineer | NASA Goddard

Phathom Donald: Hubble Space Telescope Mission Engineer | NASA Goddard


Phathom Donald Brings Space Closer as a Hubble Mission Engineer

“I'm always proud every time I see a new picture taken by Hubble," said Phathom Donald, a satellite systems engineer for the Hubble Space Telescope. "It feels like an accomplishment and an honor even to be part of a mission that brings those images to people on Earth.”

Name: Phathom Donald

Title: Mission Engineer

Formal Job Classification: Satellite Systems Engineer

Organization: Astrophysics Project Division, Hubble Space Telescope Operations Project

What do you do and what is most interesting about your role here at Goddard? How do you help support Goddard’s mission?

As a member of the flight operations team for the Hubble Space Telescope, I monitor and evaluate the performance of Hubble's subsystems through its telemetry. I send commands to Hubble as needed for routine maintenance, maintaining communication with the spacecraft, and recovery from onboard anomalies. I also support ground system maintenance to ensure that operations run smoothly and uninterrupted.

On the flight software team, I build and run simulations to verify flight software changes before they're installed onto Hubble. Just like how your laptop or your smartphone gets regular updates to add new features or to fix bugs, Hubble gets flight software updates for added capabilities and to address new issues.

Being a flight controller was a dream of mine, so being able to command a spacecraft has been really exciting. I also really enjoy coding, and it's been interesting seeing how all these critical and complicated activities happen at the same time. I think the work I do outside of my flight controller role has helped me become a better flight controller, because I have a better idea of what's happening behind the scenes—things feel a bit more intuitive to me.


How did you find your path to Goddard?

During undergrad, I was on a path to become a power systems engineer. But one day in my senior design class, our professor invited the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) project manager at the time to speak to our class about systems engineering and its applications to the mission. Within five minutes of this presentation, I was on the verge of tears. This presentation alone changed the course of my career because it reminded me that I love the stars and I love space. More importantly, it made me feel like a career at NASA was actually possible.

So, I emailed the speaker and asked him for advice, and he responded with excellent guidance and encouragement. I saved that email and essentially used it as a career guide. After graduating, I worked for a NASA contractor first as a quality engineer, then as a model-based systems engineer. While I was in that role, I pursued my master’s, and about a month after graduating, I saw the job posting for Hubble's flight operations team at Goddard. After a year or so of settling in, I reached out to that same speaker and I let him know I took his advice, I made it to NASA, and that I couldn't be more grateful for his help. He responded beautifully, saying that he was humbled to have played any role in me getting to where I wanted to be.


What first sparked your interest in space?

My dad used to take my brothers and me to the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles all the time. I loved going to those shows in the planetarium and just feeling engrossed in what they were teaching. I'd always wanted to take an astronomy class, but I didn’t get the chance until my last year of undergrad. I'm so glad I did; it just reaffirmed that space is for me.


What is your educational background?

I graduated from Howard University in Washington, D.C., in 2014 with a bachelor's in electrical engineering. I also have a master's in space systems engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. Right now, I'm pursuing a graduate certificate in control systems from the University of Michigan at Dearborn to prepare for a role supporting Hubble's pointing and control subsystems. After I'm done, I plan to pursue a graduate certificate in aerospace for that same reason; I want to pick up and hone skills in order to maximize my contributions to Hubble.


How do you keep a cool head when you have a mission-critical situation?

I think I'm generally a pretty calm person, but in moments where Hubble's mission is at risk, I tend to focus on what is in my power to get done. So I'll look at the situation and think, “OK, what can we do to either fix or mitigate this problem?” And I do what I can with care, I communicate clearly with those I'm working with, and I trust the abilities of my colleagues. I work with really brilliant, dedicated people who love what they do, so I know that they're going to do what’s best for the mission.


What is your proudest accomplishment at Goddard?

To be honest, I'm always proud every time I see a new picture taken by Hubble, especially after we've recovered it from an anomaly. It feels like an accomplishment and an honor even to be part of a mission that brings those images to people on Earth.


Who are your science role models, and how have they shaped your career in science?

Katherine Johnson: she was an African American mathematician who was pivotal in the success of the early human spaceflight missions carried out by NASA. Her complex trajectory calculations got the first man into space and back unharmed. I also admire Dr. Sian Proctor: she was the first Black woman to pilot a spacecraft.

As a minority, it can be easy to feel like an outlier in the space industry. Seeing people like Katherine and Dr. Proctor succeed and excel in these fields adds a bit of comfort. They show me that these technically demanding roles are attainable.


How do you like to spend your time outside of work? What are your hobbies?

I spend a lot of time with my tiny dog, Chara. I named her after a yellow star in the Hunting Dogs constellation. Chara is Greek for “joy,” and to say she brings me joy would be an understatement.

I actually have a new obsession with snorkeling and freediving. I went snorkeling for the first time in early 2021 and it completely changed my life. Before snorkeling, I was terrified of water. After snorkeling, I wanted to be a fish. I just love the freedom that comes with the lack of equipment. I love the peace that I feel underwater.


What is your “six-word memoir”? A six-word memoir describes something in just six words.

“The stars are not too far.”


What is some advice you would give your 10-year-old self?

You are capable of more than you know, more than what people might try to make you believe. Do what makes you feel fulfilled and define your own success. Your passion is your strength.


Conversations With Goddard is a collection of Q&A profiles highlighting the breadth and depth of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s talented and diverse workforce. The Conversations have been published twice a month on average since May 2011. Read past editions on Goddard’s “Our People” webpage: 

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/about/people/index.html


Image Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Rob Andreoli

Location: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States

Story Credit: Hannah Richter

Release Date: Jan. 31, 2023


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #MissionEngineer #SatelliteSystemsEngineer #PhathomDonald #Leader #AfricanAmerican #BlackEngineer #HowardUniversity #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #Satellite  #STScI #GSFC #GoddardSpaceFlightCenter #Greenbelt #Maryland #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

A Martian Sunrise | NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover

A Martian Sunrise | NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover


Photo captured by NASA's Perseverance Mars rover on sol 691 (January 29, 2023) at 06:13:52 Local Mean Solar Time (LMST) using the left NavCam.

Support FriendsofNASA.org | For more information on NASA's Mars missions, visit: mars.nasa.gov

Mission Name: Mars 2020

Rover Name: Perseverance

Main Job: Seek signs of ancient life and collect samples of rock and regolith (broken rock and soil) for possible return to Earth.

Mars Helicopter (Ingenuity)

Launch: July 30, 2020    

Landing: Feb. 18, 2021, Jezero Crater, Mars

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/PipploIMP

Image Date: Jan. 29, 2023

Release Date: Feb. 1, 2023


#NASA #Space #Astronomy #Science #Mars #RedPlanet #Planet #Sunrise #Astrobiology #Geology #PerseveranceRover #Mars2020 #JezeroCrater #Robotics #Technology #Engineering #JPL #UnitedStates #MoonToMars #CitizenScience #PipploIMP #STEM #Education

Monday, January 30, 2023

Working at China's Beijing Aerospace Control Center | CGTN

Working at China's Beijing Aerospace Control Center | CGTN

The Beijing Aerospace Control Center (BACC) has released a trailer about the work of its scientists. It comes after 22 consecutive successes in key Chinese space missions, including the construction of the China Space Station, the Chang'e 4 lunar probe's landing on the dark side of the moon, the Chang'e 5 lunar sample-return, and the dispatch of the Tianwen 1 robotic spacecraft and Zhurong rover to Mars.

The Beiijing Aerospace Command and Control Center (Chinese: 北京航天指挥控制中心) is a command center for the Chinese space program. This includes the Shenzhou crewed missions to the China Space Station. The BACC is located in a suburb northwest of Beijing under the administration of Haidian District.


Credit: China Global Television Network (CGTN)

Duration: 5 minutes, 32 seconds

Release Date: Jan. 30, 2023

#NASA #Space #Astronomy #Science #China #中国 #BeijingAerospaceControlCenter #BACC #北京航天指挥控制中心 #CNSA #CMSA #国家航天局 #Technology #Engineering #Rockets #LongMarch5 #Spacecraft #Robotics #Rovers #HumanSpaceflight #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Tonight’s Sky: February 2023 (Northern Hemisphere)

Tonight’s Sky: February 2023  (Northern Hemisphere)

In February 2023, the Winter Triangle is your guide to the night sky: The northern hemisphere is treated to views of the stars Procyon, Sirius, and Betelgeuse. Keep watching for the awe-inspiring space-based views of the Orion Nebula, which is sculpted by the stellar winds of central bright stars.

About this Series

“Tonight’s Sky” is a monthly video of constellations you can observe in the night sky. The series is produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute, home of science operations for the Hubble Space Telescope, in partnership with NASA’s Universe of Learning. 

This product is based on work supported by NASA under award numbers NNX16AC65A to the Space Telescope Science Institute, working in partnership with Caltech/IPAC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and Sonoma State University. 


Credit: Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Duration: 5 minutes, 32 seconds

Release Date: Jan. 30, 2023


#NASA #Space #Astronomy #Science #Earth #Planets #SolarSystem #WinterTriangle #Stars #Procyon #Sirius #Betelgeuse #Constellations #Nebula #OrionNebula #MilkyWayGalaxy #Skywatching #STScI #UnitedStates #Canada #Mexico #NorthernHemisphere #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Pillar of Sunlight over ALMA in Chile | ESO

Pillar of Sunlight over ALMA in Chile | ESO


This image is dominated by a large sky filled with blue, purple, and red clouds. Beneath them is one of ALMA’s antennae, which is pointing directly upwards and appears to be illuminated by a beam of red light.

This Picture of the Week shows the grand skies of the Chajnantor plateau in the Chilean Atacama desert. The rare sight of clouds in this typically dry and arid region creates a dramatic display of reds and blues, as well as a sun pillar––an optical phenomenon caused by ice crystals in the atmosphere––that emanates from the Sun in line with a telescope. This large antenna is a part of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), which is co-owned by the European Southern Observatory (ESO).

ALMA is one of the most powerful observatories in the world for radio astronomy. Its collection of 66 antennae—like the one pictured above—has been responsible for many incredible ground-breaking discoveries, including contributing to the creation of the first image of a black hole.


Credit: C. Duran /European Southern Observatory (ESO)

Release Date: Jan. 30, 2023


#NASA #ESO #ALMA #Astronomy #RadioAstronomy #Space #Science #Sun #Earth #Atmosphere #SunPillar #EarthScience #MilkyWayGalaxy #Cosmos #Universe #Telescope #AtacamaDesert #Chile #SouthAmerica #Europe #STEM #Education

Untangling a Knot of Galaxy Clusters | NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory

Untangling a Knot of Galaxy Clusters NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory

Astronomers have captured a spectacular and ongoing collision between at least three galaxy clusters. Data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, ESA’s XMM-Newton and a trio of radio telescopes are helping astronomers sort out what is happening in this jumbled scene.

Galaxy clusters are some of the largest structures in the Universe and contain a mixture of galaxies, hot gas and dark matter. Over time, these colossal objects can collide and merge with each other through their gravitational pull. This is the main way that galaxy clusters can grow into the gigantic cosmic edifices seen today.

Abell 2256, located 780 million light years from Earth, is a scene where this process is taking place. Astronomers studying this object are trying to tease out what has led to this unusual-looking structure. Each telescope tells a different part of the story. For example, Chandra and XMM-Newton can see the multi-million-degree gas from the clusters. The radio emission in this system arises from an even more complex set of sources.

The first are the galaxies themselves, where the radio signal is generated by particles blasting away in jets from supermassive black holes at their centers. Radio waves are also coming from a huge filamentary structure, which was likely generated when the collision created shock waves and accelerated particles in the gas.

Astronomers will continue to study this complex system to untangle this knot of galaxy clusters and the details of the physics taking place there. This will help us learn more about how these cosmic giants came to inhabit the Universe today.


Credit: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory

Duration: 2 minutes

Release Date: Jan. 30, 2023


#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Chandra #Xray #Galaxies #GalaxyClusters #Abell2256 #Cosmos #Universe #SpaceTelescope #Observatory #CXC #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

U.S. Poet Laureate's Poem Will Travel to Jupiter’s Moon Europa on NASA Spacecraft

U.S. Poet Laureate's Poem Will Travel to Jupiter’s Moon Europa on NASA Spacecraft

U.S. Poet Laureate Ada Limón is writing an original poem dedicated to NASA’s Europa Clipper mission. The poem will be engraved on the spacecraft, as a way to connect the water world of our home planet Earth with another world with water in our solar system (Jupiter’s moon, Europa).

Europa Clipper will travel 1.8 billion miles on its path to the Jupiter system. The poem will be part of an upcoming NASA-led program that will invite international public participation.

The spacecraft is set to launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in October 2024, and by 2030, it will be in orbit around Jupiter. It will conduct multiple flybys of the planet’s icy moon Europa to gather detailed measurements and determine if the moon has conditions suitable for life.

Europa, which scientists are confident harbors an internal ocean with twice the amount of water in Earth’s oceans combined, may currently have conditions suitable for supporting life. Europa Clipper will orbit Jupiter and conduct multiple close flybys of Europa to gather data on the moon’s atmosphere, surface, and interior. Its sophisticated payload will investigate everything from the depth and salinity of the ocean to the thickness of the ice crust to the characteristics of potential plumes that may be venting subsurface water into space.

Limón was appointed 24th Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden in 2022. The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. 

More information about the Europa Clipper mission is available at europa.nasa.gov/


Credit: NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

Duration: 1 minute

Release Date: Jan. 26, 2023


#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Poetry #Jupiter #Europa #Moon #Ocean #Astrobiology #Biosignatures #Habitability #Radiation #EuropaClipper #Spacecraft #SolarSystem #Exploration #APL #Marshall #MSFC #JPL #JHUAPL #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Expedition 68: New Jan. 2023 Crew Photos | International Space Station

Expedition 68: New Jan. 2023 Crew Photos | International Space Station

Cosmonaut Anna Kikina (Russia) points a camera outside a space station window

Expedition 68 Flight Engineers Anna Kikina (Russia) and Koichi Wakata (Japan)

Cosmonaut Anna Kikina (Russia) works on electronics hardware maintenance

NASA Astronaut Nicole Mann configures spacewalking hardware

NASA Astronaut Josh Cassada harvests thale cress plants for a space botany study

Cosmonaut Anna Kikina (Russia) installs radiation detectors aboard the station

Astronaut Koichi Wakata (Japan) configures spacewalking hardware

Astronaut Koichi Wakata (Japan) works on orbital plumbing tasks


Follow Expedition 68 crew updates at:

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/


Expedition 68 Crew

Station Commander: Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos (Russia)

Roscosmos (Russia): Flight Engineers Anna Kikina & Dmitri Petelin

NASA: Flight Engineers Nicole Mann, Frank Rubio & Josh Cassada

JAXA (Japan): Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata

An international partnership of space agencies provides and operates the elements of the  International Space Station (ISS). The principals are the space agencies of the United States, Russia, Europe, Japan, and Canada. The ISS has been the most politically complex space exploration program ever undertaken.


Credit: NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC)

Image Dates: Jan. 17-26, 2023


#NASA #Space #Earth #SolomonSea #ISS #Namibia #Africa #Bahamas #AtlanticOcean #Astronauts #NicoleMann #FrankRubio #JoshCassada #KoichiWakata #JAXA #Japan #Cosmonauts #Роскосмос #Russia #Science #HumanSpaceflight #Expedition68 #JSC #UnitedStates #Canada #CSA #Research #Laboratory #STEM #Education

Exploring The Turbulent Tarantula Nebula | Hubble

Exploring The Turbulent Tarantula Nebula | Hubble


A snapshot of the Tarantula Nebula (also known as 30 Doradus) is the most recent from the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope. The Tarantula Nebula is a large star-forming region of ionised hydrogen gas that lies 161,000 light years from Earth in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and its turbulent clouds of gas and dust can be seen swirling between the region’s bright, newly-formed stars.

Image Description: Wispy, nebulous clouds extend from the lower-left of the image. At the top and right the dark background of space can be seen through the sparse nebula. Along the left and in the corner are many layers of brightly-colored gas and dark, obscuring dust. A cluster of small, bright blue stars in the same corner expands out across the image. Many much smaller stars cover the background.

The Tarantula Nebula is a familiar site for Hubble. It is the brightest star-forming region in our galactic neighborhood and home to the hottest, most massive stars known. This makes it a perfect natural laboratory in which to test out theories of star formation and evolution, and a rich variety of Hubble images of this region have been released to the public in recent years. The NASA/European Space Agency/Canadian Space Agency James Webb Space Telescope also recently delved into this region, revealing thousands of never-before-seen young stars.

This new image combines data from two different observing proposals. The first was designed to explore the properties of the dust grains that exist in the void between stars and which make up the dark clouds winding through this image. This proposal, which astronomers named Scylla, complements another Hubble observing proposal called Ulysses and is revealing how interstellar dust interacts with starlight in a variety of environments. This image also incorporates data from an observing program studying star formation in conditions similar to the early Universe, as well as cataloguing the stars of the Tarantula Nebula for future science with Webb.


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)/Hubble & NASA, C. Murray, E. Sabbi

Acknowledgement: Y.-H. Chu

Release Date: Jan. 30, 2023


#NASA #ESA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Hubble #Nebula #30Doradus #TarantulaNebula #Dorado #Constellation #LMC #Galaxy #Cosmos #Universe #SpaceTelescope #HST #STScI #GSFC #UnitedStates #Europe #STEM #Education

Sunday, January 29, 2023

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot | Hubble Space Telescope

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot | Hubble Space Telescope

Hubblecast 123 Light: This video highlights Jupiter’s trademark spot and observations made of the feature by the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope that demonstrate that the spot has shrunk over time.


Credits:

Directed by: Bethany Downer

Editing: Nico Bartmann

Web and technical support: Mathias André and Raquel Yumi Shida

Written by: Bethany Downer  

Footage and photos:     European Space Agency (ESA), NASA, A. Simon, M.H. Wong, M. Kornmesser, H. Hammel, R. Beebe

Duration: 1 minute, 30 seconds

Release Date: Aug. 8, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Planet #Jupiter #Atmosphere #GRS #GreatRedSpot #SolarSystem #MilkyWayGalaxy #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #Model #Visualization #HD #Video

A Close-Up Look at Jupiter’s Dynamic Atmosphere | Hubble

A Close-Up Look at Jupiter’s Dynamic Atmosphere | Hubble


The NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope reveals the intricate, detailed beauty of Jupiter’s clouds in this image from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, when the planet was 644 million kilometers from Earth. The image features the distinct bands of roiling clouds that are characteristic of Jupiter’s atmosphere and represents a stretched-out map of the entire planet.

Researchers combined several Hubble exposures to create this flat map, which excludes the polar regions (above 80 degrees latitude). These observations of Jupiter form part of the Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program.


Credit: NASA, European Space Agency (ESA), A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley)

Capture Date: June 27, 2019

Release Date: Aug. 8, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Planet #Jupiter #Atmosphere #GRS #GreatRedSpot #SolarSystem #MilkyWayGalaxy #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

Global Model of Jupiter | NASA & European Space Agency

Global Model of Jupiter | NASA & European Space Agency

This three-dimensional model of Jupiter was computer-generated from a new global map of the planet that was taken by the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 when the planet was 644 million kilometers from Earth.


Credit: NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley), M. Kornmesser

Duration: 24 seconds

Capture Date: June 27, 2019 

Release Date: Aug 8, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Planet #Jupiter #Atmosphere #GRS #GreatRedSpot #SolarSystem #MilkyWayGalaxy #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #Model #Visualization #HD #Video

Zooming into the Great Red Spot of Jupiter | Hubble

Zooming into the Great Red Spot of Jupiter | Hubble

This video is a pan across the surface of Jupiter, featuring a zoom into the planet's trademark Great Red Spot.

This image was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, when the planet was 644 million kilometers from Earth. The image highlights the Great Red Spot in a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in the planet’s turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years.


Credit: NASA, European Space Agency (ESA), A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley)   

Duration: 40 seconds

Capture Date: June 27, 2019 

Release Date: Aug. 12, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Planet #Jupiter #Atmosphere #GRS #GreatRedSpot #SolarSystem #MilkyWayGalaxy #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Jupiter’s Colorful Palette | Hubble

Jupiter’s Colorful Palette | Hubble


The NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope reveals the intricate, detailed beauty of Jupiter’s clouds in this image by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, when the planet was 644 million kilometers from Earth. The image features the planet’s trademark Great Red Spot and a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in the planet’s turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years.

The observations of Jupiter form part of the Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program.


Credit: NASA, European Space Agency (ESA), A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley)

Image Date: June 27, 2019

Release Date: August 8, 2019


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Planet #Jupiter #Atmosphere #GRS #GreatRedSpot #SolarSystem #MilkyWayGalaxy #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

A Galactic Triplet: Interacting Galaxies | Hubble

 A Galactic Triplet: Interacting Galaxies | Hubble


A dramatic triplet of galaxies takes center stage in this image from the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope, which captures a three-way gravitational tug-of-war between interacting galaxies. This system—known as Arp 195—is featured in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, a list which showcases some of the weirder and more wonderful galaxies in the universe.

Observing time with the Hubble Space Telescope is extremely valuable, so astronomers do not want to waste a second. The schedule for Hubble observations is calculated using a computer algorithm which allows the spacecraft to occasionally gather bonus snapshots of data between longer observations. This image of the clashing triplet of galaxies in Arp 195 is one such snapshot. Extra observations such as these do more than provide spectacular images—they also help to identify promising targets to follow up with telescopes, such as the NASA/European Space Agency/Canadian Space Agency James Webb Space Telescope.


Credit: European Space Agency/Hubble & NASA, J. Dalcanton

Duration: 30 seconds

Release Date: July 26, 2021


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #Galaxies #Arp195 #Lynx #Constellation #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

A Galactic Triplet: Interacting Galaxies | Hubble

A Galactic Triplet: Interacting Galaxies | Hubble

A dramatic triplet of galaxies takes center stage in this image from the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope, which captures a three-way gravitational tug-of-war between interacting galaxies. This system—known as Arp 195—is featured in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, a list which showcases some of the weirder and more wonderful galaxies in the universe.

Observing time with the Hubble Space Telescope is extremely valuable, so astronomers do not want to waste a second. The schedule for Hubble observations is calculated using a computer algorithm which allows the spacecraft to occasionally gather bonus snapshots of data between longer observations. This image of the clashing triplet of galaxies in Arp 195 is one such snapshot. Extra observations such as these do more than provide spectacular images—they also help to identify promising targets to follow up with telescopes, such as the NASA/European Space Agency/Canadian Space Agency James Webb Space Telescope.


Credit: European Space Agency/Hubble & NASA, J. Dalcanton

Release Date: July 26, 2021


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #Galaxies #Arp195 #Lynx #Constellation #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

Saturday, January 28, 2023

Great Galaxies of The Perseus Galaxy Cluster | Hubble

Great Galaxies of The Perseus Galaxy Cluster | Hubble
Two things capture your attention in this spectacular image taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3): the two enormous galaxies that flank the left and right sides of the image. The galaxy on the left is a lenticular galaxy, which rejoices in the name of 2MASX J03193743+4137580. The side-on spiral galaxy on the right is more simply named UGC 2665. Both galaxies lie approximately 350 million light-years from Earth, and they both form part of the enormous Perseus galaxy cluster. 

Perseus is an important figure in Greek mythology, renowned for slaying Medusa the Gorgon—who is herself famous for the unhappy reason that she was cursed to have living snakes for hair. Given Perseus’s impressive credentials, it seems appropriate that the eponymous galaxy cluster is one of the biggest objects in the known Universe, consisting of thousands of galaxies, only a few of which are visible in this image.

The wonderful detail in the image is thanks to the WFC3’s powerful resolution and high sensitivity. The WFC3 is sensitive to both visible and infrared light, so those are the wavelengths that are captured in this image. The Perseus supercluster looks very different at other wavelengths. Whilst in this image the spaces between the galaxies appear dark and peaceful, when the X-ray emission is observed the Perseus cluster appears to be burning with bright intense light.


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)/Hubble & NASA, W. Harris

Acknowledgement: L. Shatz

Duration: 30 seconds 

Release Date: July 5, 2021


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #Galaxies #2MASXJ031937434137580 #UGC2665 #GalaxyClusters #PerseusSupercluster #Perseus #Constellation #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Great Galaxies of The Perseus Galaxy Cluster | Hubble

Great Galaxies of The Perseus Galaxy Cluster | Hubble


Two things capture your attention in this spectacular image taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3): the two enormous galaxies that flank the left and right sides of the image. The galaxy on the left is a lenticular galaxy, which rejoices in the name of 2MASX J03193743+4137580. The side-on spiral galaxy on the right is more simply named UGC 2665. Both galaxies lie approximately 350 million light-years from Earth, and they both form part of the enormous Perseus galaxy cluster. 

Perseus is an important figure in Greek mythology, renowned for slaying Medusa the Gorgon—who is herself famous for the unhappy reason that she was cursed to have living snakes for hair. Given Perseus’s impressive credentials, it seems appropriate that the eponymous galaxy cluster is one of the biggest objects in the known Universe, consisting of thousands of galaxies, only a few of which are visible in this image.

The wonderful detail in the image is thanks to the WFC3’s powerful resolution and high sensitivity. The WFC3 is sensitive to both visible and infrared light, so those are the wavelengths that are captured in this image. The Perseus supercluster looks very different at other wavelengths. Whilst in this image the spaces between the galaxies appear dark and peaceful, when the X-ray emission is observed the Perseus cluster appears to be burning with bright intense light.


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)/Hubble & NASA, W. Harris

Acknowledgement: L. Shatz

Release Date: July 5, 2021


#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #Galaxies #2MASXJ031937434137580 #UGC2665 #GalaxyClusters #PerseusSupercluster #Perseus #Constellation #Cosmos #Universe #HST #SpaceTelescope #ESA #Europe #GSFC #STScI #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

A Bear on Planet Mars? | NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

A Bear on Planet Mars? | NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

Wait . . . what? Is this a peculiar formation or do your eyes deceive you? 

There is a hill with a V-shaped collapse structure ("the nose"), two craters ("the eyes"), and a circular fracture pattern ("the head"). The circular fracture pattern might be due to the settling of a deposit over a buried impact crater. Maybe "the nose" is a volcanic or mud vent and the deposit could be lava or mud flows?

"Maybe just grin and bear it!" ;)

Seeing familiar objects or patterns in otherwise random or unrelated objects or patterns is called pareidolia. It is a form of apophenia, which is a more general term for the human tendency to seek patterns in random information. 

Black and white images are less than 5 km across; enhanced color images are  less than1 km.

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is a spacecraft designed to study the geology and climate of Mars, to provide reconnaissance of future landing sites, and to relay data from surface missions back to Earth. It was launched on August 12, 2005, and reached Mars on March 10, 2006. 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.


Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

Narration: Tre Gibbs

Tre's website: www.tregibbs.com

Duration: 52 seconds

Release Date: Jan. 25, 2023


#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Mars #Planet #RedPlanet #Hill #Craters #Pareidolia #Geology #Landscape #Terrain #MRO #HiRISE #Spacecraft #JPL #Caltech #UA #UniversityOfArizona #UnitedStates #SolarSystem #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Long Duration Human Spaceflight: Hibernation Research | European Space Agency

Long Duration Human Spaceflight: Hibernation Research | European Space Agency

Did you know that the European Space Agency (ESA) is researching human hibernation for long distance spaceflight to Mars or beyond? Hibernating astronauts could be the best way to save mission costs, reduce the size of spacecraft by a third and keep crew healthy on their way to Mars. An ESA-led investigation suggests that human hibernation goes beyond the realm of science-fiction and may become a game-changing technique for space travel.

When packing for a return flight to the Red Planet, space engineers account for around two years’ worth of food and water for the crew.

Torpor during hibernation is an induced state that reduces the metabolic rate of an organism. This ‘suspended animation’ is a common mechanism in animals who wish to preserve energy.

Reducing the metabolic rate of a crew en route to Mars down to 25% of the normal state would dramatically cut down the amount of supplies and habitat size, making long-duration exploration more feasible.

Mimicking therapeutic torpor, the idea of putting human into a state of hibernation, has been around in hospitals since the 1980s—doctors can induce hypothermia to reduce metabolism during long and complex surgeries. However, it is not an active reduction of energy and misses most of the advantages of torpor. Studies on hibernation to visit other planets could offer new potential applications for patient care on Earth.

Animals hibernate to survive periods of cold and food or water scarcity, reducing their heart rate, breathing and other vital functions to a fraction of their normal life, while body temperature lowers close to ambient temperature. Tardigrades, frogs and reptiles are very good at it.

Lower testosterone levels seem to aid long hibernation in mammals, estrogens in humans strongly regulate energy metabolism.

With the crew at rest for long periods, artificial intelligence will come into play during anomalies and emergencies.

The possibilities of hibernation for medical use is of particular interest to the European research community and could transform how we approach many severe illnesses.

Inducing torpor is already used in some medical environments such as surgical theathers to replace anesthesia in those patients allergic to anesthetic drugs.

The step to space research is closer than you might think. Get involved with spaceflight research via https://www.esa.int/spaceflightAO

Find out about our commercial partnerships and opportunities in human and robotic exploration via https://www.esa.int/explorationpartners to run your research in microgravity as well.


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)

Duration: 8 minutes

Release Date: Jan. 25, 2023

#NASA #ESA #Space #Science #Astronauts #HumanSpaceflight #SolarSystem #Mars #RedPlanet #Exploration #HumanBiology #AnimalBiology #Hibernation #Torpor #LifeSupport #LongDurationMissions #LifeSciences #Europe #MedicalResearch #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Expedition 68: NASA’s SpaceX Crew-6 | International Space Station

Expedition 68: NASA’s SpaceX Crew-6 | International Space Station


The four SpaceX Crew-6 members pose for a portrait underneath a Falcon 9 rocket booster at SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, California. From left, are Mission Specialist Andrey Fedyaev of Roscosmos; Commander Stephen Bowen and Pilot Warren "Woody" Hoburg, both from NASA; and Mission Specialist Sultan Alneyadi from the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre of the United Arab Emirates (UAE)


SpaceX Crew-6 crew members inside SpaceX Hangar X at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida

SpaceX Crew-6 crew members pose for a photo on the SpaceX helipad at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida
SpaceX Crew-6 crew members pose for a photo during a training session at the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39A in Florida

The four crew members of NASA's SpaceX Crew-6 mission to the International Space Station are Mission Specialist Sultan Al Nedayi of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Mission Specialist Andrey Fedyaev of Roscosmos (Russia), Pilot William Hoburg (NASA), and Commander Stephen Bowen (NASA). Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Sunday, Feb. 26, 2023.

Astronaut Sultan AlNeyadi from the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center (United Arab Emirates) will make history by being the first astronaut from the Arab world to spend six months on the International Space Station (ISS). AlNeyadi has undergone a 20-month long rigorous training for the Crew-6 mission. AlNeyadi began his training in September 2018, at the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center at Star City in Moscow, Russia.

Cosmonaut Andrey Fedyaev (Russia)

Andrey Valerievich Fediaev (Russian Cyrillic: Андрей Валерьевич Федяев; born February 26, 1981) is a Russian cosmonaut. Fediaev received his an engineering degree in air transport and Air Traffic Control from the Balashov Military Aviation School in 2004. Following graduation, Fediaev joined the Russian Air Force in the 317th mixed aviation segment. He obtained the rank of major before his retirement in 2013. He logged over 500 hours in Russian aircraft.

Fediaev was selected as a cosmonaut in 2012. He reported to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in 2012 and was named a test cosmonaut on June 16, 2014.

On July 15, 2022, he was assigned to the SpaceX Crew-6 mission after a recent crew swap agreement between NASA and Roscosmos.

NASA Astronaut William Hoburg's Official Biography:

https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/warren-hoburg

https://www.nasa.gov/content/warren-hoburg-phd-nasa-astronaut

NASA Astronaut Stephen Bowen's Official Biography:

https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/stephen-g-bowen

NASA’s Commercial Crew Program (CCP) works with the American aerospace industry to provide safe, reliable, and cost-effective transportation to and from the International Space Station on American-made rockets and spacecraft launching from American soil.

An international partnership of space agencies provides and operates the elements of the International Space Station (ISS). The principals are the space agencies of the United States, Russia, Europe, Japan, and Canada. The ISS has been the most politically complex space exploration program ever undertaken.


Credit: Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX)

Image Dates: Aug. 8, 2022 - Jan. 13, 2023


#NASA #ESA #Space #Earth #Science #ISS #SpaceX #CrewDragon #Spacecraft #SpaceXCrew6 #Astronauts #SultanAlNedayi #MBRSC #UAE #Cosmonaut #AndreyFedyaev #Russia #Россия #Роскосмос #WilliamHoburg #MIT #StephenBowen #USNavy #CCP #HumanSpaceflight #UnitedStates #STEM #Education

Friday, January 27, 2023

Honoring Our Fallen Heroes | This Week @NASA

Honoring Our Fallen Heroes | This Week @NASA

Honoring our fallen heroes, working on a nuclear option for space travel, and the next crewed mission to the space station . . . a few of the stories to tell you about—This Week at NASA!


Credit: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Video Producer: Andre Valentine

Video Editor: Haley Reed

Music: Universal Production Music

Duration: 2 minutes

Release Date: Jan. 27, 2023


#NASA #Space #Earth #ISS #SpaceXCrew6 #Moon #Artemis #Astronomy #Science #NASARemembers #Astronauts #Apollo1 #SpaceShuttleChallenger #SpaceShuttleColumbia #Scientists #Engineers #Heroes #History #SolarSystem #Exploration #UnitedStates #History #STEM #Education #HD #Video

Iceberg Larger than London Breaks Off Antarctica’s Brunt Ice Shelf | ESA

Iceberg Larger than London Breaks Off Antarctica’s Brunt Ice Shelf | ESA

Satellite imagery confirms an iceberg around the size of Greater London broke off Antarctica’s Brunt Ice Shelf due to a natural process called ‘calving’. The iceberg, measuring 1550 sq km, detached from the 150 m-thick ice shelf a decade after scientists first spotted massive cracks in the shelf.

For more information on the newly-birthed A81 iceberg: https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Copernicus/Giant_iceberg_breaks_away_from_Antarctic_ice_shelf


Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)

Duration: 4 minutes

Release Date: Jan. 27, 2023


#ESA #Space #Earth #Planet #Satellites #Copernicus #Sentinel #EarthObservation #RemoteSensing #Atmosphere #Oceans #Climate #ClimateChange #Meteorology #Antarctica #BruntIceShelf #Iceberg #A81Iceberg #STEM #Education #HD #Video